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Programme of conhIT 2017

Here you can find all the conhIT events. The various topics range from the Opening Ceremony through the Congress, Academy and divers Networking options up to the conhIT Closing Party. All the Congress sessions are translated simultaneously into English.

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April 25, 2017

Academy

Implementing Risk Management in Compliance with the Law

April 25, 2017
09:00 - 13:00 h

Academy Room, Hall 2.2

Press dates

Opening Press Conference of conhIT 2017

April 25, 2017
09:15 - 10:15 h

PR Room, Hall 1.2

Host: 

conhIT - Connecting Healthcare IT

Congress

Digitisation of the Health Industry as an Opportunity for Bavaria

April 25, 2017
09:30 - 09:45 h

Congress Hall A

The state of Bavaria believes that the digitisation of healthcare creates a great potential for individual citizens and offers wide-ranging business opportunities. The Bavarian state government is currently supporting this development with a variety of measures, ranging from the expansion of the research infrastructure to increased interconnectedness, assistance for start-ups and support for projects.

Digitisation in the healthcare sector and the associated potential for innovation can make a significant contribution to improving the quality of care and reducing expenditure on healthcare. Appropriate legal conditions have to be created in order to enable new digital solutions to be applied in Germany.

Congress

Enhanced Recovery after Intensive Care

April 25, 2017
09:30 - 09:45 h

Congress Hall C

There are more than 2 million critically ill patients in Germany year of which 400,000 are mechanically ventilated. [1] About 20 % of the entire in-patient-sector related costs are allocated to these patients. In the Berlin-Brandenburg region, according to current estimates, 2000 patients are being treated with extraclinical ventilation. [2]

Scientific articles revealed that survivors of critical illness frequently suffer from long-term consequences. For example, 40% of the mechanically ventilated patients have cognitive disturbances after three months. More than half of these disturbances are comparable to an Alzheimer’s dementia. The majority of these cognitive impairments remains measurable in comparable intensity after one year. [3] Furthermore, anxiety symptoms are apparent in half of the patients and 25% suffer from a post-traumatic stress disorder. [4] Moreover, between 48% and 96% of ICU survivors have a severe muscle disturbance that persists for years and reduces the patient’s ability to walk. [5]

However, there are evidence-based quality indicators in intensive care medicine which have a positive influence on outcome if adhered to. [6]

The primary aim of ERIC is the prevention of long-term consequences after intensive care. This will be achieved with an improved implementation of QIs (inner-sectoral modification) by implementation of an eHealth-platform, as well as a case-care management. This case-care management will track patients after discharge and can also initiate a re-admission if necessary to ultimately reduce long-term impairments (e.g., long-term, ambulatory ventilation, inter-sectoral modification).

Tracking Number: 01_NVF_16011

The intervention will be conducted in a cluster-randomized controlled design. Ten centers will be recruited to include 2044 patients within one year. The cluster-design allows an equal distribution of patients to the treatment and the control group.

The intervention consists of a daily tele-medical round of patients treated in the new case-care management program. This will improve the QI-adherence in participating centers. A preceding blended-learning program will homogenize centers in the ability to deliver QI-based treatment.

Invoicing and consent will be obtained through selective-contracts with health-care insurance providers.

ERIC is one of the first projects of the Innovative Committee´s "New Forms of Care" program. The project was assessed as evidence-based and regionally viable. The evaluation concept is robust and has been developed with clinicians, biometrists and health economists. It will allow a comprehensive assessment from patient’s perspective, clinical perspective and economic perspective after three years. The overall objective is, according to the funding-program, that ERIC can subsequently become a general standard of care in Germany.

Congress

Opportunities for the Health System Offered by Wearables and their Cognitive Accessibility

April 25, 2017
09:30 - 09:50 h

Congress Hall B

As systems for assisting doctors, the cognitive incorporation of efficient, wearable sensors has the potential for obtaining individual therapeutic adjustments from a continuous supply of medically relevant readings, and for improving the quality of medical care for individual patients. At the same time such a system takes into account the demographic change, because  it enables medical data to be recorded and analysed through its connection to the latest IT technology and without requiring the presence of medical personnel. Such systems could assist the physician in charge so that, on the basis of this data, he can accurately extract the relevant findings required for diagnosis and treatment, and in this way obtain a compete overview more quickly.

Congress

Session 1 | Digital Agenda – Where Does the Healthcare Industry Remain?

April 25, 2017
09:30 - 11:00 h

Congress Hall A

Congress

Session 2 | The Benefits of Robotics and the Internet of Things for Hospital IT

April 25, 2017
09:30 - 11:00 h

Congress Hall B

Partner Event

Sitzung der GMDS-Arbeitsgruppe Datenschutz und IT-Sicherheit im Gesundheitswesen (DIG)

April 25, 2017
09:30 - 13:30 h

Room Passau 7

Host: 

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Medizinische Informatik, Biometrie und Epidemiologie e. V. (GMDS)

Congress

From the Product to Process Innovation – What can Pharmacology Provide?

April 25, 2017
09:45 - 10:00 h

Congress Hall A

It is no longer enough for the pharmaceutical industry simply to develop innovative product. There is a need for integrated concepts encompassing prevention, diagnosis and therapy. This requires digital assistance, in research and development too. It is only by improving the efficiency of our system in this way that we will be able to continue to be able to fund innovation.

Congress

General, Specialized Medical Care and Emergency Medical Aid in a Rural Area - Using the Example of Dermatology

April 25, 2017
09:50 - 10:05 h

Congress Hall C

The aim of the project is to test the possibilities of telemedical applications for the care of skin-borne patients in rural areas. Skin diseases are particularly suitable, since skin changes can easily be mediated through pictures. For example, physicians, specialists and emergency ambulances in hospitals can use an app to view, discuss, and decide how to deal with symptoms. After 2.5 years, it is examined to what extent the personal care provided by the specialist can be changed, especially in the case of serious cases, while at the same time unnecessary treatments and long waiting times of the patients can be avoided.

Congress

Medical Device Security Bridges based Virtual Private Network Architecture versus Medical Device Isolation Architecture

April 25, 2017
09:55 - 10:15 h

Congress Hall B

In a treatment context medical products are becoming increasingly network-linked and are operated as complex medical product systems. The paper provides an overview of the current situation from the perspective of a university clinic and compares alternative approaches to the use of IT as a means of improving the security of distributed medical product systems.

Medical products are being operated increasingly as complex, network-linked medical product systems. Due to the complexity of the licensing procedure, medical systems are often unable to keep up with the security update cycles. In view of this situation network-attached devices, the most important category in a medical context, are most at risk in terms of IT security. Concepts such as Medical Device Isolation Architecture do address this problem but, in view of current technical developments, no longer appear to be sufficiently up to date. For example, if one considers the specifications of the ‘VA Information Protection – Medical Device Isolation Architecture Guide 2009, Version 2.0 – August 2009’ from the US Departments of Veterans Affairs, a large hospital has to deal with an almost exponential rise in the number of dedicated protected sub-networks. It is therefore necessary to analyse the status quo in the network management of medical devices, to describe the state of the art and to use this information to derive alternative processes for IT management in hospitals.

The situation and the consequences of the application of a Medical Device Isolation Architecture strategy will be shown in a case study at the University Clinic Erlangen. A study of the relevant literature will provide an overview of the security strategies for network systems currently under discussion.

Results show that IT security protection measures must focus to a greater extent on endpoint security. However, the stringent licensing obstacles for medical equipment do present a problem. One solution is to consider network security and the actual medical device as technically separate modules. In this case the medical device is logically separated from the clinic’s production network by a smart Medical Device Security Bridge (MDSB). With this concept a Medical Device Virtual Private Network (MDVPN) is set up, so that a smart medical product network can be created independently of any particular manufacturer. This avoids any complexity when operating secure sub-networks. Medical Device Security Bridges can also be adapted modularly to meet the corresponding safeguarding requirements. The use of gateway systems enables the MDVPN to be opened in a controlled way, e.g. in the production network.

Medical Device Isolation Architecture as a concept is too complex for providing network security for medical products in practical operation in large hospitals. The examination of alternative IT security concepts reveals that the subject under consideration here has so far not been satisfactorily resolved in the context of distributed medical product networks, and must be urgently addressed.

Discussion and Abstract: IT security in the context of networked medical product infrastructures represents a very challenging subject. Possible alternative solutions must be urgently translated into practical technical and organisational concepts. One way of doing this could be to set up MDVPNs on the basis of MDSBs. This would allow a protected IT system for networked medical devices to be set up that would be largely decoupled from the clinic’s production network. In view of current developments in IoT and cloud computing, and against the background of stringent security requirements in the medical product context, any possible security concepts must be urgently tested to determine their practical applicability.

Congress

Digitization – Potentials for Innovation in Health

April 25, 2017
10:00 - 10:15 h

Congress Hall A

In the healthcare sector, digitization will lead to new structures and optimized processes promote innovative business models, and stimulate innovations that will help improve quality in all segments of healthcare.

The rapid advancement and spread of what are known as mobile “quantified self” devices, or “wearables,” is leading citizens to continuously enter their “electronic health records” via corresponding m-health applications. This facilitates online coaching that draws on current and individual data and stimulates competition, both internally and against others. Networking via social media can provide essential incentives for healthier behavior.

Around the world, more and more medical data are being collected that contain vast amounts of empirical knowledge on health and the chronological sequences of diseases. The correlation and evaluation of these databases generates knowledge that can be crucial for early detection, as well as for the treatment of diseases. Approaches like data mining/artificial intelligence must be further developed.

The population’s interest in solutions that help older people at home is increasing. For example: mental fitness applications, compiling fall risks with suitable counter-measures, or various assistance systems for caring for people suffering from dementia. By and large, relatives are greatly interested in getting information on their parents’ fitness online.

Basically, there are many opportunities to develop innovative products and services that are not just of regional interest, but are in demand worldwide. The results are noticeable growth opportunities, both for medtech companies and also for business formations. The healthcare system must be digitized in order to be able to achieve these positive effects. Data protection needs to be designed in such a way that positive effects can definitely emerge and data security remains assured. The market for digital health is estimated to reach USD 230 billion by 2022.

Congress

The Digital Transformation in Health Care – a Sector Caught Between Stagnating Tradition and Disruptive Leaps

April 25, 2017
10:15 - 10:30 h

Congress Hall A

There is an increasing call for greater digitisation in healthcare, but in Germany the participating interest groups continue to have a stranglehold on each other. There are a multitude of reasons for the lack of progress in the digitisation of the German healthcare market. The situation is only likely to alter if there is a change in the way of thinking about these issues.

Congress

Intrinsic Neuromuscular Feedback Therapy with a Neuronal Controlled Robot / Exoskeleton (HAL Robot Suit)

April 25, 2017
10:20 - 10:40 h

Congress Hall B

he intrinsic neuromuscular feedback therapy with will-controlled bioelectronic and robot control is a novel therapy method for the treatment of patients with spinal cord injuries, muscular diseases and strokes.

Patients suffering from spinal cord injury who are currently in the focus of the therapy must have at least weak, voluntary generated residual impulses in the muscles of the lower extremities. In neuromuscular feedback therapy the neuronal movement command is derived by the muscle reaction. Individual movement support is provided by the exoskeleton. This leads to an improvement in the response of the skeletal muscle to the control commands of the brain.

In the course of the healing, the patients show a clearly progressive improvement of their mobility (balance, endurance, spatial awareness). Therapy is performed by using the Hybrid Assistive Limb (HAL). The HAL system is a development of the Japanese company Cyberdyne, Inc. The HAL system is a neuronal controlled robot system. It has two movable legs that can imitate physiological human movements, a pelvic ring for the fixation of the system to the patient and skin electrodes. The neuronal motion pulses sent to the leg muscles are recorded by the skin electrodes and processed in the HAL system. The exoskeleton supports the movement idea of the wearer and converts it into complete movements. This leads to an improved response of the partially paralyzed musculature to the neuronal stimulus.

This results in a reconstruction of the still responsive muscles, whereby the patient achieves a significant improvement of his own potential for regeneration. The neuromuscular feedback therapy is indicated to spinal cord injured patients with voluntary EMG activity on the lower extremities. By its own nerve impulses, which enter into the legs and at the same time transmit the movement intention into the robot system connected to the body via an EMG signal, there is simultaneity of the internally wanted and with external support realized movement. The own movements and those performed by the robot are perceived as a unit. The exhaustion limit of the patients in the therapy decreases significantly because of the supplied force support an intensive training is made possible. A large number of research studies have already been carried out, some of those have been separated from the major projects listed below.

Pilot study: Eight chronic spinal cord injured patients, the accident was one to 20 years ago. All patients were insured by the accident insurance in order to expect a qualitatively good therapy offer - a consistent therapy standard - for the past.

Human-machine interface robot-suit project (MMIRS, EU-funded socioeconomic study): Beginning spring 2013, end in June 2015 with 26 patients with

paraplegia (traumatic and non-traumatic) NEDO project: Beginning Autumn 2013, end in March 2016, 52 patients with paraplegia (traumatic) and a cross-over study on stroke patients

Individual case study on muscle diseases: Beginning 2015, 10 patients

The results will be presented. Subsequently, the participants will be able to test the functioning of the neuronal controlled robot / exoskeleton in "self-test".

Congress

Emma – Electronic Medication Management

April 25, 2017
10:30 - 10:45 h

Congress Hall C

Pharmacotherapy contains many potential sources of error. These include a lack of information, language barriers, incomplete medication plans, interactions between medically prescribed drugs and self-medication, an insufficient exchange of information between general practitioners and hospital physicians, a lack of suitable instruments for a systematic optimisation of medications, and many other factors. All these risks can be reduced with the aid of AdAM.

The first step is always to obtain the patient’s approval. With the latter’s permission the physician can approach the BARMER health insurance scheme to request data that is relevant to the treatment, and to provide data about drugs and the medical case history. The physician can, for example, use this as the basis for drawing up a nationally uniform medication plan for the patient, and can use electronic systems to support the work of carrying out checks on the pharmacotherapy for individual patients. Physicians are also given concrete, patient-related notification of any new drugs or new risks, and about rulings on drugs from the Joint National Committee. In this way, for example, it is possible to rapidly take into account important information about innovative drugs and to assess their benefits in everyday care. Moreover, the physician can also call in advice from pharmaceutical experts in the case of patients who are particularly at risk. If a patient is admitted to hospital the general practitioner will be automatically notified and can then pass on the relevant details to the hospital.

AdAM is being implemented in Westfalen-Lippe. The aim is to enlist in this project 85 per cent of the 440,000 people insured with BARMER who are receiving multiple medication. Interest has already been shown by 1,000 physicians. The project, which will run for 36 months, is expected to release its findings by the end of September 2019. It is hoped to be able to transfer the results into standard care, enabling the project to be used to assist up to 18.6 million patients.

Congress

Panel Discussion with All Speakers

April 25, 2017
10:30 - 11:00 h

Congress Hall A

Congress

Panel Discussion with All Speakers

April 25, 2017
10:45 - 11:00 h

Congress Hall B

Congress

Panel Discussion with All Speakers

April 25, 2017
10:50 - 11:00 h

Congress Hall C

Congress

AOK Nordost - Innovative Trailblazer in Employing Digital Care Systems to Improve Health Care for Patients

April 25, 2017
11:30 - 11:45 h

Congress Hall A

Digital approaches play an increasingly important part in patient care. As an insurance provider that aims to guarantee good levels of care for the people it insures, even in structurally weak regions, AOK Nordost is specifically concerned with adopting sensible digital approaches. The paper presents two examples of this.
Demographic changes, altered demands on the part of those it insures, and in some cases an imminent shortage of medical specialists, have led AOK Nordost to also deploy modern, digital solutions for the people that it insures. Here the main motivation is the benefit for the patient.

Material, Methods and Tools

MoodGYM: An online self-help programme developed in Australia under the name ‘MoodGYM’ has been translated into German by a team of experts at the University of Leipzig. With the support of AOK the programme has been evaluated in a GP setting in a randomised controlled study. AOK Nordost has successfully employed this programme to provide therapeutic support for people with depression.

Jourvie: In a cooperative project with ‘Jourvie’, AOK Nordost is deploying a prize-winning app for young people with eating disorders.

Description of the solution (application software / application or implementation concept)

MoodGYM: The patient is guided through the programme by animated characters. Programme users can see how these characters experience and evaluate situations. Various building blocks are offered in the programme. Each building block accompanies the user along the path from the old to new way of thinking. Five dimensions are shown: feelings, thoughts, change, getting rid of stress, and relationships. Moods are enquired into, images are used to enable the user to learn what factors lead to depressive feelings, and how they can influence them. Finally the user is shown what has already been achieved with MoodGYM. MoodGYM is used as a component of the care programme ‘Depression in family practices.

Jourvie: The app enables people with eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia and binge eating to receive support. The app contains the following functions: digital records of food consumed and moods, personalised memory function, coping and motivational strategies and the export and transfer of archive data to the therapists. Jourvie is deployed as part of the ‘AOK Junior’ care programme. In addition to the applications referred to, the respective care programmes also form part of the presentation.

Results

MoodGYM: Firstly users of the programme learn how their feelings can influence their thoughts. Wishes and hopes are made clearer, and unhelpful thought patterns are modified. Users learn to change the way that they deal with stress, as well as learning how stress can arise, and how to relax.

Jourvie:  In 2015 Jourvie received an award from the Bayer Foundation, and this year Jourvie was selected as one of 10 beacon projects in the Google Impact Challenge. AOK Nordost is convinced of the value of this app and is eagerly awaiting the findings of a randomised study investigating the effectiveness of this digital solution for female anorexia patients who are awaiting outpatient therapy (SELTIAN Study).

As the largest health insurance scheme in its region, AOK Nordost sees itself as the driving force behind digital projects and the services that it offers for supporting and improving the care provided for those it insures. In so doing AOK Nordost combines innovative digital approaches with the analogue range of care.

Congress

IHE in Germany - Where We Are and Where We Will Develop!

April 25, 2017
11:30 - 11:45 h

Congress Hall B

IHE Germany has etsablished a couple of important descriptions, how to implement the IHE profiles in the german market. First step had been the IHE Cookbook, provided by IHE Germany since some years.  In addition IHE Germany formed a very active Workinggroup to define the german flavour of value sets, used tp descripe the XDS.b Metadata, when building up Healthrecords.

This specification can be used now to make local, regional or national Implementations interoperable.

Congress

Session 4 | Mobile Health & Apps

April 25, 2017
11:30 - 13:00 h

Congress Hall A

Congress

Session 5 | Interoperability and Systems Integration

April 25, 2017
11:30 - 13:00 h

Congress Hall B

Congress

IMeRa: Integrated Mobile Health Research Platform

April 25, 2017
11:45 - 12:00 h

Congress Hall A

IMeRa is an IT project backed by the state of Baden-Württemberg to provide a digital medical research platform for research- and patient-related data, which is collected and used by means of mobile terminals. This platform is set up in the form of an infrastructural measure to facilitate the handling of medical research data and as the basis for implementing an IT solution for collaborative research projects (including clinical studies) that are not confined to individual disciplines and locations. Another objective is to promote medical research through networked data, mainly by establishing interfaces with existing research data bases.

Research-motivated applications for IMeRa include research-related patient monitoring (remote readings of vital parameters, e.g. using suitable activity trackers and the transfer of such data to the clinic), documentation of studies, as well as research projects for improving aftercare for patients with neurovascular, endocrinological and oncological and also psychiatric and other illnesses by obtaining more efficient outcome readings (e.g. patient surveys by means of mobile devices, sensor data). The development of the planned IT infrastructure and associated IT applications will enable not only researchers but also, for example, patients in a clinical study, to communicate more efficiently with research-related data bases using mobile terminals. The improvements in information processing that are obtained in this way also support the development of relevant studies as a result of the greater scope and density of the data and improved data quality.

The main points are: PCORnet common data model v3.0 as the pattern for the core data model; OO analysis and design; frameworks for the development of Java-based mobile medical applications, in-house Java developments in the back-end sector; best possible cryptographic encryption process to protect highly sensitive medical data; iterative, agile procedural model

The mobile data repository for research forms the core of IMeRa. A use case-specific, expandable, conceptual core data model is defined for this purpose. Communication with mobile devices (including Activity Tracker), while maintaining data protection and data security, is supported by software modules that have been developed in-house. The solution also includes the development of interfaces with subordinate research databases, with the integration of clinical data and other communication partners (external clinics). Ultimately a development basis is created for mobile medical research applications (data capture, questionnaires, communication, reporting).

Mobile apps were successfully integrated in the ImeRa platform during a scientific pilot study of child and youth psychiatry, thereby demonstrating the feasibility and usability of IMeRa for practical applications. The original approaches to the solution (esp. communication with mobile apps) had to be modified for this procedure, and the various solutions offered are more broadly based than originally planned. The many-layered requirements of users can only be met by methods involving agile software developments and evolutionary product development.

There was a significant response to the project, both internally and externally. Other use cases will be implemented and incorporated in the platform. The successful approaches will be transferable (from mid-2017 for external users) and are expandable, thus making them applicable for subsequent projects. The IMeRa funding project will run until March 2018.

Congress

The latest HL7 Standard: Future-proof Integration with FHIR

April 25, 2017
11:45 - 12:00 h

Congress Hall B

FHIR is the latest Addition to the HL7 product family. Based on modern but well tested and reliable technologies, it provides a basis for the fast and secure development of interoperable systems, compatible with both established standards as well as future technologies such as implantable and wearable sensors.

This presentation lays out the basic principles of FHIR and shows how to interconnect practitioners and patients, clinicians scientists, inpatient and outpatient care, service providers and payors by leveraging the power of FHIR to integrate mobile app and descision support services with EHRs.

Congress

Integration of Apps into the Swiss Electronic Health Record. What is Possible?

April 25, 2017
12:00 - 12:15 h

Congress Hall B

Switzerland issued in 2016 the Federal Law on Electronic Health Records and is building a decentralized distributed electronic health record. The architecture of the health record is based on the profiles of IHE with swiss-specific adaptations and extensions. The health record will allow the citizen to share his treatment-relevant documents with the practitioners. How can apps be integrated into the health record ? On the basis of current standards development in healthcare such as HL7 FHIR and the Continua Guidelines, various possibilities are presented and discussed.

Congress

mHealth and the ePatient Dossier: How the ePatient Dossier Supports mHealth

April 25, 2017
12:00 - 12:15 h

Congress Hall A

From 2020 citizens in Switzerland will be able to open an electronic patient dossier (ePatient dossier). Under the relevant federal law patients will also be able to upload data into the ePatient dossier. Three quarters of all Swiss own a smartphone, and with the spread of apps and wearables, mHealth applications are an obvious choice. To facilitate mHealth applications for the public and those treating them within the scope of the ePatient dossier, eHealth Suisse has set up a working party to deal with the relevant areas of action, and various recommendations have been made by this group. eHealth Suisse is funded by the Federal Health Office and the cantons, and coordinates the work of the cantons in all aspects of eHealth and the ePatient dossier.

The working party has identified three relevant thematic areas. These are the legal parameters, interoperability and the competence of potential users.

Legal framework
For the certification of medical products the regulatory framework, with the adoption of EU regulations in Swiss law, is sufficient. However, the producers of apps and devices are inadequately informed about when a product should be certified and how to proceed. The following recommendations have been made.

When using mHealth applications within the scope of the ePatient dossier, on the one hand national data protection laws should apply, and secondly, those of the country where the manufacturer is domiciled. This can present difficulties if an mHealth application being operated in accordance with foreign law is combined with the ePatient dossier. Consequently the legislative developments in those countries with extensive market power should be examined and the impact on Swiss data protection law should be determined accordingly. Measures should be taken on this basis.

A number of players are involved in fixing the tariffs. Furthermore, proof of the effectiveness, practicability and economic efficiency of the benefits is required prior to the inclusion of the benefits in the schedule of benefits. Within the scope of the recommendations it has therefore been decided in particular  to use research funding to show the benefits of mHealth applications and to raise the awareness of the social parties about the inclusion of mHealth benefits in collective agreements.

Interoperability
The working party has also examined the subjects of interoperability and the competence of potential mHealth users. The subject of interoperability is of major importance for the low-threshold inclusion of mHealth applications in the ePatient dossier. Accordingly international standards are recommended.

Competence of potential users
The sheer volume of mHealth applications and the lack of transparency about product information present a major challenge to users. Consequently it is difficult to select the product that has the required functionalities and to be certain that data protection and IT security can be maintained. On the other hand data has to be valid and reliable for it to be used as the basis for medical decision-making. Accordingly the working party has decided to produce a catalogue of criteria as guidance for users. This should be completed by the manufacturers and published on a platform. Furthermore information should be supplied with the aim of heightening user awareness about the opportunities and risks in their dealings with mHealth.

The report is being presented at a public hearing in mid-December. The definitive report will be published in the first quarter of 2017. The recommendations will subsequently be more strictly defined and implemented. We will be able to examine the results of the public hearing at ConhIT 2017.

Congress

Integrating Patient Apps into Medical Office Software

April 25, 2017
12:15 - 12:30 h

Congress Hall A

A rising number of start-up companies and established enterprises are providing apps for the health care industry – some of them with the potential of optimizing not only the everyday work of medical staff, but also doctor-patient communication and patient care as a whole.

Integrating these mobile applications into medical office software is the only way to make use of their benefits and tap their full potential. This fact is reflected in the increasing number of inquiries which medatixx, one of the leading providers of medical office software in Germany, has been receiving from external app providers.

Patients make up a user group for health apps that is strongly characterized by a high degree of differentiation with regards to such characteristics as education, affinity for IT, health insurance status, age, state of health (healthy, acutely or chronically ill) as well as indication. Due to their heterogeneity there is a diverse and ever growing offer of apps just for patients. At present 9 out 10 apps are targeting the patient user group. This is particularly remarkable given German patients’ low propensity to spend.

In order to meet the rising demand for integrated health apps medatixx has drawn a vision of medatixx-AppPoint, their own marketplace for medical apps. medatixx-AppPoint is backed up by an IHE- interface which enables a simple yet deep integration of external applications and apps into medical office software. This “universal interface” replaces file based interfaces, such as GDT-interfaces (GeräteDatenTransfer / device data transfer), and significantly reduces the effort both medatixx and external app providers have to put into the proprietary development of special interfaces for individual systems.

Any app developer can promote their mHealth solutions on the medatixx-AppPoint provided they signed an agreement with medatixx concerning data privacy as well as the technical, organizational and commercial framework.

medatixx-AppPoint is a platform promoting applications and apps for both patients and medical professionals which are integrated into medatixx’s solutions for medical office software. Data can be transferred directly into patients’ medical files in the medical office software, thus simplifying doctor-patient communication. medatixx-AppPoint also offers orientational help to both patients and healthcare professionals when it comes to navigating the jungle of more than 100,000 health apps on offer.

With their own patient service app called “x.patient” medatixx has laid the groundwork for realizing their vision. x.patient enables direct communication between patients’ smartphones and doctors’ medical office software. It is a channel for automated and structured data flow between patients and their individual electronic patient files.

First experiences from implementing the concept of medatixx-AppPoint are discussed: What kind of data from patient apps are involved? How and where are they represented and documented in the medical office software? What’s the frequency of data transfer from patients to their medical files? Who is able to trigger the transfer – only the patient? Or the patient after consulting with a doctor? Automatic transfer?

medatixx-AppPoint will also feature medical apps targeting only healthcare professionals according to the same principles described earlier. These apps can be related to diagnostics, therapy or prevention as well as business efficiency of the medical practice. In this sense, they serve to complement the range of solutions offered by medical practice software. Examples are the integration of knowledge databases, vaccination planners as well as solutions for data archives, online booking and online consultations.

Congress

Mobile Applications Use eHealth Standards for Innovative Services for Patients

April 25, 2017
12:15 - 12:30 h

Congress Hall B

Nowadays patients use their mobile devices during hospitalization and at home. To inform patients better about their treatments, HELIOS would like to offer the patients helpful digital services.

  • Pre-information for the patient
  • Questionnaires to support medical staff
  • Consultation Appointments
  • Access my data (e.g. Doctor´s letter)


These Services are to be offered to patients as mobile application in the familiar environment. The development of these mobile applications is based on established and widely used technologies like FHIR, HTML5 and oAUTH.
Using eHealth standards HELIOS would like to increase the process integration between different sectors and the data exchange between HELIOS institutions.

Congress

Panel Discussion with All Speakers

April 25, 2017
12:30 - 13:00 h

Congress Hall A

Congress

Panel Discussion with All Speakers

April 25, 2017
12:30 - 13:00 h

Congress Hall B

Excursion

Diagnostic platform for radiology at Medneo GmbH

April 25, 2017
13:00 - 16:00 h

Medneo GmbH, Potsdam

Host:

Berlin Partner for Business and Technology

Opening session

Opening session conhIT 2017

April 25, 2017
13:30 - 14:30 h

Congress Hall A

Host:

conhIT - Connecting Healthcare IT

Partner Event

Practical Seminar on Documentation and Accounting: Support for Accounting Processes Through ID Clinical Context Coding

April 25, 2017
13:30 - 15:30 h

Room Passau 2

Host:

ID Information und Dokumentation GmbH & Co. KGaA

Panel Discussion/ Presentation

BMBF Initiative for Promoting Medical Informatics – What Output Can We Expect?

April 25, 2017
14:30 - 15:30 h

Networking Area, Hall 3.2

Host:

German Association for Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology (GMDS)

Panel Discussion/ Presentation

Digitisation in Nursing – When Does the Penny Drop?

April 25, 2017
14:30 - 15:30 h

Networking Area, Hall 4.2

Host:

German Association of Health IT Vendors (bvitg)

Guided Tour

IT Security

April 25, 2017
14:30 - 15:30 h

bvitg Booth C-117, Hall 4.2

Host:

German Association of Health IT Vendors (bvitg)

mobile health ZONE

Newcomer Startup Pitch

April 25, 2017
14:45 - 15:45 h

mobile health ZONE, Hall 2.2

Host:

German Association of Health IT Vendors (bvitg) and German Association for Internet Medicine (BIM)

Partner Event

Kommissionssitzung der Verbände GMDs, BVMI und GI

April 25, 2017
14:45 - 17:30 h

Room Lindau 1, Meeting Bridge A, Hall 2.2

Host:

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Medizinische Informatik, Biometrie und Epidemiologie e. V., (GMDS), Berufsverband Medizinischer Informatiker e. V. (BVMI) und Gesellschaft für Informatik (GI)

Workshop

Presentation of Current Research Work by Scholarship Students

April 25, 2017
15:00 - 16:00 h

Congress Hall A

Host:

Friedrich-Wingert-Stiftung

International Networking

International Market Opportunities for Digital Health Companies

April 25, 2017
15:00 - 16:30 h

International Networking Lounge powered by GTAI, Booth B-111, Hall 4.2

Host:

Germany Trade & Invest

Panel Discussion/ Presentation

focus “EU General Data Protection Regulation – A New Situation for Maintenance and the Processing of Orders?“

April 25, 2017
15:45 - 16:45 h

Networking Area, Hall 3.2

Veranstalter:

Working Group on "Data Security and IT Security" of German Association of Health IT Vendors (bvitg)

Guided Tour

IT-Solutions in Care

April 25, 2017
15:45 - 16:45 h

bvitg Booth C-117, Hall 4.2

Host:

German Association of Health IT Vendors (bvitg)

Panel Discussion/ Presentation

What Happens in the Case of the Interoperability Index?

April 25, 2017
15:45 - 16:45 h

Networking Area, Hall 4.2

Host:

German Association of Health IT Vendors (bvitg)

mobile health ZONE

Growth Strategies for Digital Health Start-ups

April 25, 2017
16:00 - 17:00 h

mobile health ZONE, Hall 2.2

Host:

German Association of Health IT Vendors (bvitg) and German Association for Internet Medicine (BIM)

Workshop

Consolidation and Use of Distributed Healthcare Data – Medical Data Science

April 25, 2017
16:00 - 17:30 h

Congress Hall A

Host:

MIRACUM-Konsortium

Business Meeting

Speed Networking Event: Start-up Meets Corporate

April 25, 2017
16:00 - 18:00 h

Business Meetings Area, Hall 4.2

Host:

German Association of Health IT Vendors (bvitg), Health 2.0 Berlin and HealthCapital Berlin-Brandenburg

Panel Discussion/ Presentation

HIS 2025 – What Direction Is It Taking?

April 25, 2017
17:00 - 18:00 h

Networking Area, Hall 3.2

Host:

German Association of Hospital IT Managers (KH-IT)

Guided Tour

Mobile Health

April 25, 2017
17:00 - 18:00 h

bvitg Booth C-117, Hall 4.2

Host:

German Association of Health IT Vendors (bvitg)

Panel Discussion/ Presentation

Standardised German Medication Plan: Is the Door to eHealth Open?

April 25, 2017
17:00 - 18:00 h

Networking Area, Hall 4.2

Host:

Working Group on "Medication Safety and Interoperability" of German Assocation of Health IT Vendors (bvitg)

Evening Event

conhIT-After Work

April 25, 2017
18:00 - 20:00 h

South Entrance

Host:

conhIT - Connecting Healthcare IT

International Networking

Evening Reception: Dutch Digital Health Night

April 25, 2017
18:00 - 22:00 h

Dutch Embassy, Klosterstr. 50, 10179 Berlin

Host:

Dutch Embassy

April 26, 2017

Academy

Designing and Using Mobile Systems and Apps

April 26, 2017
09:00 - 13:00 h

Academy Room, Hall 2.2

Academy

Requirement Analysis for Software Systems

April 26, 2017
09:00 - 13:00 h

PR Room, Hall 1.2

Congress

Health Information Exchange and Management, a DACH Perspective

April 26, 2017
09:30 - 09:45 h

Congress Hall C

Congress

Barcode Supported Medication Processes for Improved Patient Safety

April 26, 2017
09:30 - 09:50 h

Congress Hall B

Optimisation of the process of preparing and dispensing medications with the inclusion of a dispenser bar code in compliance with the EU standard (GS1).

Documentation software for the process of placing medicines in compliance packs and dispensing them using existing medicine bar codes (PZN) as well as patient and staff bar codes.

Introduction:

Commitment to an accountable ‘closed loop’ medication process, in hospitals

Motivation:

Increased patient safety through extended checking as part of the prescription of medications, their preparation and the process of dispensing them to patients.

From 2019 the obligation to trace batches by means of more precise documentation in the 2D bar code (EU-Falsified Medicines Directive 2011/62/EU)

Question:

Is this not already available in our processes and software solutions, and how should it be developed further to guarantee these requirements/obligations?

Material, methods and tools

  • Medication dispensers
  • Software incl. illustration of the process stages of ‘work lists’ and ‘Integration of mobile bar code readers’ and ‘Bar code printers’
  • Staff passes with bar code
  • Patient arm bands with bar code

Integrated scanner support in the ORBIS clinic information system from Agfa HealthCare provides for an active interpretation of different bar codes with the support of current standards (primarily GS1) in the health care sector.

Conversely the use of standards is essential in the unambiguous allocation of materials, medications, patients, services etc.

Labelling a medication dispenser with a GSRN/SRIN enables the unambiguous identification of a medication service for a patient. One single scanning procedure suffices to unambiguously identify the patient and also his medication. This implementation is to the best of our knowledge unique on the German market.

The availability of medication bar codes with additional batch and serial numbers and expiry date ensures that this data also refers to a specific patient and it is possible to trace batches back from medication to patient.

Results, Experiences and “Lessons learned”

The integration of the developed software and hardware solutions offers very real advantages in process support within the wider framework of ensuring the safety of pharmacotherapy.

The solution, and with it the processes illustrated during the course of the medication, are readily accepted by care staff, in pharmacies and in medical services, and also provide extensive security against liability.

 

A reduction of CIRS cases to a minimum is clearly evident. Based on the experience obtained we shall be modifying the medication process:

  • Approval of the medication by a pharmacist
  • Apart from acute medications, the medication is dispensed exclusively by PTA‘s

The described solution will be rolled out throughout the facility and also at the network’s other locations.

Congress

Session 7 | Digitalization from a Hospital's Point of View

April 26, 2017
09:30 - 11:00 h

Congress Hall A

Congress

Session 8 | Improving the Efficiency of Processes – Added Value through IT

April 26, 2017
09:30 - 11:00 h

Congress Hall B

Congress

Session 9 | Global Perspectives on Health Information Exchange

April 26, 2017
09:30 - 11:00 h

Congress Hall C

Congress

The Objectives of Clinic 4.0

April 26, 2017
09:35 - 09:50 h

Congress Hall A

The introduction of Hospital 4.0 is producing significant qualitative improvements in terms of the structure, processes and results, with obvious benefits for patients. It offers wide-ranging possibilities for making the processes in hospitals more transparent and standardised, and therefore much more economical. However, there are obstacles resulting from a lack of financing opportunities and the diversified interests of those involved.

Congress

Health Information Exchange and Management, an EU/Irish Perspective

April 26, 2017
09:45 - 10:00 h

Congress Hall C

This presentation gives an examination of some the steps currently taking place in Ireland to bring our healthcare IT system into the 21st century in terms of health information exchange as well as an EU initiative to encourage data exchange across member states.

We begin with an overview of the area in which Mr. O’ Dwyer works in order to give context. The HSE itself is branched into two areas, the Acute Services Division and the Community Health Organizations. Mr. O’ Dwyer is CEO of one of the Acute Hospital Division areas, the South/South West Hospital Group/ The South/South West Hospital Group comprises of nine hospitals in the south, southwest, and southeast of Ireland.

In terms of new innovations in ICT in the Irish health service, one exciting plan in place is that of Electronic Health Records (EHRs). This presentation will give an overview of the system being brought into Ireland, as well as the expected benefits of this.

The idea of cross EU data exchange will then be discussed, with a focus on the importance of the role of SNOWMED CT in this endeavor.

Congress

Complexity Overcome? Multi-resource Management as the Focus of a Process-oriented Hospital Information System

April 26, 2017
09:50 - 10:10 h

Congress Hall B

Typically the complex integration of different planning systems and the lack of service orientation in current hospital information systems hamper efforts to improve efficiency and effectiveness at the present time. The paper documents the development of a completely new kind of HIS generation, which makes multi-resource management the focus of consistent process orientation, and describes the experiences obtained from it.


Among experts the overwhelming consensus is that a process-oriented working method forms the basis for mastering the increasing complexity and demands for effectiveness and efficiency. With the focus on processes, it is particularly important to ensure the coordinated availability of all the resources. Therefore, in the approach presented here, multi-resource management forms the core of the Hospital Information System. Starting with the treatment processes, the aim is to establish  consistent management and optimisation of resources in accordance with a set of rules. Resource management is applied to all dimensions (personnel, rooms, equipment). In this context it is evident that restricting one’s view to the duration of stay in hospital continues to impose restrictions on targeted planning and efficient implementation of the process flows. To overcome this it has been necessary to also overcome the limits imposed by individual facilities and sectors. The logical consequence is: multi-resource planning involving prior cross-sectoral information and with early transfer of the information obtained from the treatment processes to any institutions that may be providing follow-up treatment. 

   
The new generation of HIS has been evolving since 2013 using flexible software development methods, with the emphasis on services and modularity. The user-interface has to meet the expectations influenced by consumer products and should be made available across all platforms, and on mobile devices too, via HTML5.


So far the first modules for the prioritised areas of ‘Medication management’, ‘Temperature charts’, ‘Nursing management’ and ‘OP management’ have been developed to maturity and deployed in installations in Germany, Austria and Switzerland.  Initial evaluations have been made from the experience gained in pilot projects in differing environments, thereby creating a learning curve that will be presented here.


In particular we are in a position to report on experience gained from the implementation of the necessary organisational adjustments and preparations, and the initial efficiency effects thereby obtained. One particular focus is on the impact on medicine, nursing care and management. During the introduction one major strategy is to build, in an evolutionary way, on an existing information system, particularly those used for patient administration and accounting, and in so doing to protect existing investments. Experience gained with the initial projects is also presented with regard to this scenario.

Congress

Improving Efficiency through Clinical Context Coding and Drug Management

April 26, 2017
09:55 - 10:15 h

Congress Hall A

Sample data will be used to present the possibilities for improving processes derived from the deployment of the two software solutions. Interfaces sharing the same content are used to establish links between the two projects and to create a smooth transition. In this presentation the main emphasis is on the documentation, encoding and prescription processes. Possible solutions are demonstrated, citing various practical examples.

CCC

Medical documents such as medical reports, OP reports and findings represent important sources of information in the treatment of patients. At the present time extensive resources are being applied, both in the ongoing encoding process and in the final checking of a case by an encoder, in order to determine diagnoses, procedures and medications in the files. The completeness and quality of the encoding, however, cannot be guaranteed. Semantic processing of medical free form texts enables data that is relevant for accounting purposes, such as diagnoses, procedures, laboratory findings and medications, to be identified and submitted for possible encoding. MDA and medical controlling can directly access these “semantically digitised” documents during case encoding. During this process the software recognises codes, abbreviations and complex formulations, even in an interleaved form and excluding negations. The relevant sources are underlined in colour, making it easy for the encoder to identify them. In addition CCC enables the encoding progress to be correlated with the information in the case files. In so doing the instances for previously documented codes are identified and suggestions made for additional passages in the documents to be encoded. The use of such components helps to improve the quality of the documentation, shorten the documentation process and increase revenues.

Drug controlling

Pharmacotherapy is the commonest form of medical treatment and is received by almost all hospital patients during their stay. Many individual processes are involved, from the prescription of a drug by the physician providing the treatment to the documentation of the administration of the medication. Various people from different departments are involved in these processes, leading to a significant risk potential that can adversely affect quality and cost effectiveness. With the aid of a specially developed management tool the retrospective study of the relevant processes is intended to improve the safety, quality and cost effectiveness of pharmacotherapy. ID EFIX® PHARMA combines the data compiled in ID MEDICS® for medication-based therapy and the results of ID PHARMA CHECK® with the data from the §21 KHEntgG data set. Numerous relevant issues can be processed using predefined dashboards and with the possibilities for users to create their own dashboards. For example, investigations can be made of incorrect indications or cost calculations for CP-compliant medications, divided into the areas of Economy, Pharmacology and Medicine. Cases where medications are dispensed without the corresponding ICD or OPS documentation can be identified and, using mass simulation, can be checked for any possible effects on revenues. An evaluation of the ID PHARMA CHECK® results can offer pointers for optimising prescription processes. Linking medication data and §21 data enables analyses to be made of typical examples of treatment. In this way it can be shown, for example, what medication was given, in what DRG, in what ward, and in combination with what diagnoses. This information can be used, for example, for the more efficient management of delirium or antibiotics.

Congress

Health Information Exchange and Management, an Italian Perspective

April 26, 2017
10:00 - 10:15 h

Congress Hall C

Partner Event

Design Thinking: Searching for and Finding Innovations

April 26, 2017
10:00 - 13:00 h

Room Weimar 1, Meeting Bridge B, Hall 4.2

Host:

User Interface Design GmbH

Congress

Health Information Exchange and Management, a Polish Perspective

April 26, 2017
10:15 - 10:30 h

Congress Hall C

Presentation of the Regional IT Healthcare Platform on the example of implementation of the Integrated Information System within the Podlaskie e-Health Information System (PSIeZ) project in Podlaskie Region, Poland. The main objective of the project was to build a complex regional e-Health information system open to all service beneficiaries and to allow smooth exchange of medical data and information among the existing systems, including central ones. The digitization of medical entities was to cover not only the administrative part (EOD, ERP, BI), but as well medical part (HIS, EHR). The regional EHR system (RRDM – Regional Repository of Medical Documentation) was not only to facilitate access to medical documentation to doctors and patients, but also to streamline communication (via contact mailbox), attaching patient’s own documentation and information about their health. Furthermore, doctors obtained an insight into medical documentation of patients from other entities. The implementation involved 36 units: Marshal’s Office of Podlaskie Region, 25 medical units, 10 poviat starost offices. The project range covered almost 8,700 employees.

Congress

Digitisation of the Interdisciplinary Tumour Board Process

April 26, 2017
10:15 - 10:35 h

Congress Hall B

Until now, a paper- and email-based process has mostly been followed in interdisciplinary conferences in order to find the best possible treatment for oncology patients. In the course of digitisation and the conversion to electronic files it is advisable to integrate such processes in the HIS, thereby making them more efficient. An i.s.h.med-integrated solution from the two Munich university clinics and the Cerner company is used to show the difference between standard administrative processes and a digitised solution. In 2015 at the University of Munich clinic alone more than 14,000 oncology cases were discussed. The DKG calls for every cancer patient to be presented in an interdisciplinary conference at least once. However, the administrative process, from patient registration to passing on information, holding the meeting, follow-up and writing up the recommended treatment, is very extensive. In many cases the process is created by the clinics themselves, with a sequence of telephone conversations/fax messages/emails and the use of a paper-based file. In the course of digitisation an electronic tumour board solution has been developed, in order to handle the large number of cases efficiently, and this incorporates the entire process in the HIS. A comparison of the two procedures is intended to show the advantages of the new electronic process.

Using a clinical mandate physicians can register patients for a board directly from the HIS. In so doing explicit medical specialties can be requested or additional documents that are relevant to the conference (e.g. laboratory readings) can be attached. A link up with the tumour documentation system enables data to be pre-allocated from there, thereby avoiding the need to enter data more than once. As with paper-based methods, each board has an administrator, who monitors the registrations and, if necessary, undertakes rescheduling/amendments. The software is also used in the preparations for the conference. During the conference, in addition to the projector for displaying the medical imaging, a large screen is also used, where the patient’s registration data can be shown simultaneously. In this way all participants share the same basis in the discussion. The software also enables decisions taken by the board during the conference to be documented directly in the system, which can then be included in the reference letter. This process is shown in a live demonstration via remote access on the server of the Munich University Clinic.

Results, experience and lessons learned

  • Entire process in one system
  • All relevant documents immediately available in the HIS
  • Transparent and audit-ready
  • Adaptable to meet special requirements of individual clinics
  • Not only usable as a tumour board but also for many other interdisciplinary conferences
  • Good research basis

As of November 2016 16 boards have been equipped with the new software at KUM 8. Other boards will follow in the foreseeable future. In this respect one challenge will be presented by a special case of a board with a very large number of participants (80 instead of the average of 15 patients), which was not known at the time the application was being planned. A standard is currently being rolled out which is intended to acquaint users with the new system. If needed, the special requirements of individual clinics can be accommodated in a second roll-out phase, which would, for example, then receive a separate clinical mandate. The software was originally intended as a tumour board, but it can also be used for any other interdisciplinary conference, and this features in future plans.

Congress

Possibilities for Internationally Standardised Practical Solutions

April 26, 2017
10:20 - 10:45 h

Congress Hall A

The diversity of medical devices has been steadily increasing ever since the 1950’s. In contrast, interoperability between the various types and brands of products is not improving at the same pace. Where devices are interoperable, they are typically part of an insular solution.

In keeping with the IEEE 11073 series of standards, since the beginning of the 21st century, protocols, terminologies and device profiles have been developed to enable interoperable networking of medical devices at the point of care. To date, only a few of the standards defined in the series have become firmly established on domestic and international markets. This is partly due to the complexity of the subject matter and related regulations, but also to the use of outdated communications standards. As a result, manufacturers and research institutions have implemented their own pilot projects on modernising communications protocols and preparing for dynamic networking, parallel to work on the IEEE 11073 standards.

Between 2012 and 2015, the results of these pilot projects were consolidated in the OR.NET joint project. The core of this consolidation effort is a service-oriented architecture, called a SOMDA (service-oriented medical device architecture), in which medical devices assume the roles of service provider and service consumer. The participants can exchange domain-based data on an IP backbone via a standardised service. There are many possible applications for a SOMDA and in future these will support and improve workflows in day-to-day work at hospitals. One specific example is centralised patient monitoring on intensive-care wards. Instead of having all the vital parameters, device settings and alarms of monitoring, respiratory and infusion pumps available only at the point of care, all these data can be grouped and centralised in a SOMDA – similar to instrumentation in an aircraft cockpit or on the bridge of a ship. A further development stage will enable reduction of the distances covered by medical staff, optimisation of patient file maintenance or even reduction of the number of alarms at the patient’s bedside.

Extensive empirical tests have shown that the SOMDA concept can be applied to medical devices. In a next step, the concept will be standardised in keeping with IEEE stipulations. Three standardisation projects have been launched for this purpose. These have been assigned the numbers P11073-20702, P11073-10207 and P11073-20701 and are due to be ratified by 2018. When these standards are published, medical device manufacturers will be able to equip their products with the new communications technology. All three standards involve the definition of an enabling technology. Nevertheless, further work is still needed to ensure interoperability of the devices as well as to reap the benefits this provides.

Congress

Integration of HIE and Electronic Health Records: The Experience of One US Academic Medical Center and the Surrounding Community

April 26, 2017
10:30 - 10:45 h

Congress Hall C

In the United States Obama Health Care Reform launched a digital revolution in health care information by providing financial incentives for hospitals and doctors to convert medical records to electronic format. Subsequent financial incentives were provided in a program called “Meaningful Use” which rewarded providers for using electronic records to meaningfully document Quality of Care. Electronic Medical Records have laid the foundation for communication among providers, between providers and patients and between health care organizations.

Objectives:

  • Describe the Use of Health Information Technology common in large US Medical Centers  
  • Describe the Use of Electronic Records to Promote Evidence-Based Care and Improve Quality
  • Describe the architecture of HIE in San Diego County, California
  • Describe Some Challenges and Opportunities of the US System

Congress

Panel Discussion with All Speakers

April 26, 2017
10:30 - 11:00 h

Congress Hall B

Congress

Panel Discussion with All Speakers

April 26, 2017
10:45 - 11:00 h

Congress Hall C

Congress

Panel Discussion with All Speakers

April 26, 2017
10:45 - 11:00 h

Congress Hall A

International Networking

Market Insights by International Partners

April 26, 2017
11:00 - 12:30 h

International Networking Lounge powered by GTAI, Booth B-111, Hall 4.2

Host:

Germany Trade & Invest

Partner Event

Beiratssitzung der gematik Gesellschaft für Telematikanwendungen der Gesundheitskarte mbH

April 26, 2017
11:00 - 13:00 h

Room Weimar 3, Meeting Bridge B, Halle 4.2

Host: 

gematik - Society for Telematic Applications of the Health Insurance Card

Partner Event

Focus on the User – User-Centric Processes to Develop Successful Digital Health Solutions

April 26, 2017
11:00 - 13:00 h

Room Lindau 4, Meeting Bridge A, Hall 2.2

Host:

Cluster IKT, Medien, Kreativwirtschaft und IDZ

Partner Event

Networking Meeting: Games for Health – Playing for Health?

April 26, 2017
11:00 - 14:30 h

Room Weimar 5, Meeting Bridge B, Hall 4.2

Host:

HealthCapital Berlin-Brandenburg und Cluster Med-Tech

Congress

Patient Orientated Documentation in Hospital as a Requirement for Successful Intersectoral Therapy Chain

April 26, 2017
11:30 - 11:50 h

Congress Hall C

A complete documentation of all process participants within a hospital is a requirement for successful further treatment after discharge.

The most varied occupational groups take care of the patient in the hospital. Various information is needed. These are often present, but are not transferred to the system during the admission. Here you have to define what is relevant when recording for the subsequent processes. During the entire treatment, care must be taken as to what is and how to be documented. Knowledge must be available to all stakeholders in the right form. In the end, a report is to be generated, which can be used for further treatment of the patient outside the hospital.

The professional groups must decide together what should be documented. A few dynamic masks are intended to depict the treatment. The communication of the professional groups has to be depicted via the IT, so that decisions can also be reproduced at a later stage. The forms can only be created by the input of those who work on the patient.

Specific examples show how such a cross-occupational, patient-centered documentation can look like. Intelligent forms support users. The step of an ""electrical"" documentation, which only maps the paper sheets 1: 1, to the real electronic documentation is the challenge. Klinikum Oldenburg has faced this challenge by introducing standardized documentation at home.

Thinking in an electronic file is a paradigm shift. Users have to learn that the electronic file is not the implementation of the paper files into the IT, but that there are a lot more possibilities. This will lead to unprecedented transparency, which may be painful for many people.

Congress

ATMoSPHÄRE: Care Management of Patients with Multimorbidity as an Example for Interoperability and Connectivity

April 26, 2017
11:30 - 11:55 h

Congress Hall B

An ageing population requires innovative, patient-focused IT systems for the management and support of patients in the home environment and for coordinating regional providers of healthcare and social services. We are using the interdisciplinary ATMoSPHÄRE network to develop and trial a decentralised, federated health platform for this purpose.

The implementation of appropriate concepts is a complex process in the provision of care for multimorbid patients throughout all stages of life. At the present time numerous obstacles exist, making it difficult to deal with multimorbid patients and their requirements. The ATMoSPHÄRE project was set up in Saxony, with contributions from DRK, GeriNet, Fraunhofer IMW, TUMAINI, vital.services and Philips, and with 3.3 million euros of funding from BMBF. Its intention was to overcome the obstacles imposed by the IT systems currently in use, and to achieve the secure networking of all the parties involved in the provision of care, from the fields of medicine and nursing, as well as the social and commercial service providers. The purpose of the project is to develop, trial and research a standardised, interoperable health platform.

The health platform is produced using as an example a care network to be created specially for the project in order to include as many different IT systems as possible within a common platform. The period allotted for the implementation of this project is from October 2015 to September 2018. It is planned to involve 700 patients. On the basis of an iterative process the project and its partners will be given the opportunity to continue developing functionality and interoperability, incorporating feedback from all the users. The scientific evaluation will be a longitudinal process.

In order to overcome the problem of a lack of networked systems and the scalability of existing approaches in healthcare, an open, interoperable Ecosystem will be used, in which the providers of healthcare and social services will have access to a common but decentralised data stock, by means of a supervised standard interface. Now, for the first time, the Ecosystem enables a network to be created, linking medical care and social services, and meeting the exacting requirements of German data protection. The Ecosystem not only provides information about findings and documentation, but also uses telemedical solutions to link all the parties involved in the provision of care in the ongoing treatment process.

In seeking to gain the approval of its target group efforts will be made to minimise fears about surveillance or the cost of powering the tablets. Moreover, different professions and institutions must be displayed. In this way differing background knowledge and experience should be integrated and taken into consideration in the communication process. Particular attention should be paid to integrating the requirements of professionals because without this it will not be possible to deploy the system or to subsequently transfer it to an actual care situation. 

Over time we have been able to coordinate practical care requirements, to specify them and to optimise the processes. In the ongoing project particular attention is being paid to continuous optimisation of the platform and to the scalability of the solutions that have been worked out. Taking into account what has already been accomplished, we are confident of being able to overcome the challenges that still face us and, in a number of areas, to even surpass the requirements of the submitted project application.

Congress

Session 10 | Decision Support for Board and Management

April 26, 2017
11:30 - 13:00 h

Congress Hall A

Congress

Session 11 | Use of IT in Quality-oriented, Cross-sectoral Care Management

April 26, 2017
11:30 - 13:00 h

Congress Hall B

Congress

Session 12 | IT-based Interface Management in Nursing – Reality or Fiction?

April 26, 2017
11:30 - 13:00 h

Congress Hall C

Congress

Clinical Management 4.0 - Quality, Markets, Mobility and Performance Indicators

April 26, 2017
11:40 - 12:00 h

Congress Hall A

Städtisches Klinikum (Municipal Clinic) Braunschweig is one of the largest municipal hospitals in Germany with a maximum supply mandate. In 2016 the management discussed the subject of Clinic Management 4.0 in depth.
Driven by the requirements of future, quality-oriented hospital planning, the aim is to achieve a rational harmonisation of quality and economy. Quality indicators, patient safety indicators and other economic parameters serve as the basis.
The reasons for the patient’s choice of clinic must be intensively investigated and analysed.
Here the decisive factor is the hope of obtaining a resolution to a problem, and the confidence in obtaining this solution. The solution is offered in terms of the structure, standard and safety. The level of confidence is increased by safeguarding and guaranteeing a treatment with properties that are consistently maintained. The aim is to use structured medicine as a solution to patients’ problems and develop it further as a medicinal product. In so doing the focus should be on the promise of performance for a product in terms of cost, deadlines and qualities. If this can be met the result is confidence and recommendation.

Congress

The eWound Report in a Standard-based Register Environment

April 26, 2017
11:50 - 12:00 h

Congress Hall C

'The skin is the largest organ in the human body. Injuries that do not heal well present particular demands on documentation. Cross-facility wound documentation is a serious approach in efforts to achieve suitable treatment of wounds, in particular if this is based on internationally accepted standards, thereby promoting interoperability.

Wound documentation is feasible nowadays and presents no problems, given the various apps that are available. There are plenty of examples of this. However, these are proprietary, and the possibilities for exchange with other treatment providers are very limited. We shall show that another approach is possible, without any comprises in functionality or convenience.

The eHealth Composite Platform from Deutsche Telekom Healthcare und Security Solutions represents a middleware that can be used to develop applications which can be executed independently of a specific platform and are also based exclusively on such interoperability standards as HL7 und IHE, thereby promoting an interoperable exchange of data. ART-DECOR as a standard repository provides invaluable assistance in the deployment of interoperability standards. A dictation solution is another component that is not absolutely necessary but certainly an added convenience (in this case from DictaTeam). When integrated in a smart app it allows dictation as well as photo integration, thereby freeing a physician from the complicated work of recording data. 

Used in many national and international projects (IHE, ELGA, NICTIZ, BC, etc.), the editor for CDA templates by the name of ART-DECOR provides support in the development and availability of templates that permit a structured recording of data. The eHC Forms Designer enables an interface to be designed which offers users a convenient way of entering data. These components can easily be integrated in existing applications in the form of a web container.

In combination with a microphone and a camera  - both available as standard with a smartphone or tablet – the solution can be expanded to include a dictation function and photo documentation. The first of these means that physicians can avoid the inconvenience of recording data using a keypad, while photo documentation provides invaluable qualitative assistance in tracking a healing process.

Data entered manually or by dictation, and the photos taken, are converted into CDA documents, which correspond to the Clinical Document Architecture Format. Using IHE XDS these documents can then be stored in a so-called affinity domain. XDS is an acronym for Cross-Enterprise Document Sharing and refers to the storage of any documents in a manufacturer-neutral form, which makes an inter-institutional exchange of data possible.

Along with a direct exchange of data between the physicians in charge, this solution is also ideal for setting up a corresponding register, in order to generally improve treatment processes.  Depending on the specific requirement it is then only necessary to introduce the appropriate anonymisation or pseudonymisation services beforehand.

The application presented here shows the existing possibilities, in the hope that a uniform infrastructure can be worked out for registers, and in this way it is not necessary to keep re-inventing the wheel.

Congress

Quality Assurance Through the Linkage of Patient Surveys with Routine Data on the Basis of an Electronic Patient Record (PEPA)

April 26, 2017
11:55 - 12:20 h

Congress Hall B

Complex treatment processes lead to quality problems and shortcomings in patient safety. Many of these quality deficits along the entire care chain can only be reported by patients themselves. Cross-sectoral patient surveys therefore represent an essential source of data for making a quality assessment. In §137a of the Social Security Statutes V the legislators have specified the development of an indicator-based measurement construct for measuring supplementing this with instruments for conducting patient surveys. This requires a pseudonymised data linkage of patient survey data and clinical data (e.g. routine data). The sectoral separation of care also impacts on the data availability of routine data: the data that is available has differing structures and varies in quality, being mostly belated and at different times, as well as in different data sources. Collating the necessary data is therefore complex and, apart from data protection issues, it also reveals interoperability problems as a consequence of different and incompatible standards. It is against this background that a regional quality assessment involving the various different professions has been developed as part of the BMBF project INFOPAT (Information Technology for Patient-oriented Health Care in the Rhein-Neckar Metropolitan Region). The intention is to improve cross-sectoral care quality using as an example the care provided for people with bowel cancer, on the basis of a patient-oriented, socio-technical approach.

For this purpose an iterative research design was selected that mutually incorporates social requirements and technical development. Firstly a concept was developed for measuring regional care quality, integrating patient surveys and quality indicators, so to speak, on the basis of data warehousing. The source of the data for quality monitoring is provided by a parallel development in the form of a Patient-moderated Electronic Patient File (PEPA). With the patient’s approval the data obtained from the patient survey and the clinical data of relevance to the quality, which are available in document form, are transferred from the PEPA to a data warehouse. Here they are linked in a standardised form, analysed and, if necessary, reported.

 

Quality concept

The measurement concept currently covers a selection of ten quality indicators (clinical data) and patient surveys on (1) patient experiences, (2) patient-reported outcomes (PRO) and (3) quality of life.

 

IT implementation

To record PROs a questionnaire module was imported into a patient portal. Patients receive notifications through new questionnaires, which are provided for them to fill in. Once it has been filled in the replies are used to generate a CDA and this is uploaded to the PEPA. New questionnaires are uploaded from the PEPA, pseudonymised (by a data trustee) and transferred to a research platform for the purposes of providing quality reports. Transfer is by means of open, standardised interfaces (IHE XD*). By the same route, using the questionnaire module, structured documentation makes its way via forms to the research platform.

Notwithstanding all the contentual and methodological obstacles that exist at present in the cross-sectoral linkage of clinical data, a PEPA as data source can demonstrate an alternative implementation of regional quality monitoring.

 

Author: Dr. Stefan Nöst (University Medical Center Heidelberg)

Congress

Quality as a Management Objective – What can IT Contribute?

April 26, 2017
12:00 - 12:20 h

Congress Hall A

As a result of the Hospital Structure Law the subject of quality becomes a determining factor in the hospital sector. As a term, quality is undefined and a definition is therefore needed. However, it does have positive connotations and can therefore be used as a vehicle for many things.  The most difficult aspect is to specify quality when discussing the quality of outcomes. At the same time the quality of outcomes is really the paramount aspect as far as patients are concerned.
In 2016 the Itzehoe Clinic decided to join the IQM. 6 out of 10 senior consultants underwent peer training.
‘Process quality’ is not simple to define, but easier than in the case of the quality of outcomes. There is a danger of resorting to bureaucratic regulations and minimum personal standards (Level 1 Intensive).  Structural quality is easiest to define and a highly suitable vehicle for accompanying hospital planning measures and intentions.
The most demanding task is that of supplying management with information on subjects which are in some cases not entirely clear. In some cases they have also (still) not been dealt with by the GBA. Together with traditional risk management a clinical risk management that in many cases is still undergoing development, an overall picture of the different developments, risks and action areas must be offered to management. The trick is to show highly complex subject matter and relationships in a readily comprehensible form.

Congress

IT Networking between Care Facilities and General Practitioners within the Project

April 26, 2017
12:10 - 12:30 h

Congress Hall C

The exchange of data and information between family doctors, medical specialists and nursing staff is a central challenge in treating care-dependent patients. In order to more effectively monitor the state of health of patients and to improve the flow of data between the various participants, MicroNova AG is conducting a pilot project on behalf of Ärztegenossenschaft Westfalen-Lippe to interconnect nursing teams and general practitioners.

The biggest obstacle to providing continuous and appropriate care for chronically ill patients receiving in-patient care is the distance between them and the doctor treating them, both spatially and in time. Moreover, the lack of interfaces between the care facility on the one hand and the practice administration system of the family doctor and medical specialist providing the treatment on the other is an obstacle to the exchange of information. One result of this is the large number of frequently avoidable hospital admissions with all the associated consequences.

To improve this situation Ärztegenossenschaft Westfalen-Lippe has initiated a project by the name of ‘senimed-it’. Its main aim is to create an IT network between the family doctor, medical specialist and nursing facility as an improved intersectoral interface, in order to achieve better, more structured patient care in in-patient nursing facilities.

In this project five nursing facilities and ten general practitioners were linked together using the MicroNova networking solution ViViAN. Interdisciplinary, coordinated information modules and a medication management system are used to ensure the best possible, coordinated care for the residents of the nursing facility. It was possible to retain the existing care documentation and practice administration systems .

Digital interconnection offers the following advantages:

  • Improved and structured monitoring of the progress of the illness and the avoidance of complications
  • Relieving pressure on nursing staff in homes and on specialist medical staff in practices through the online availability of the relevant documentation
  • An early warning system provided by a central medication information plan
  • Preparation and improved effectiveness of interdisciplinary visits to care homes (including with pharmacists and medical specialists)
  • Avoidance of unnecessary hospital referrals
  • Improvements to transfer and discharge management

Congress

Management and IT Management at Group and Clinic Level

April 26, 2017
12:20 - 12:40 h

Congress Hall A

  • Representation of the particular situation of a private concern with a corresponding focus
  • Effects on general IT strategy
  • Effects on IT-assisted management tools
  • Anticipated changes as a result of KHSG – Hospital Structure Law - (but, or course, also the changes in the psych sector)
  • Reporting of quality information / indicators

Congress

Psychiatric Crisis Service 2.0 - Online Collaboration and Coordination of the Psychatric Centre of kbo-Isar-Amper-Klinik

April 26, 2017
12:20 - 12:45 h

Congress Hall B

The psychiatric medical service of clinics of the region Oberbayern (kbo) uses samedi®-Software to optimise their workflows and collaboration with care provider in their own psychotherapy-network. The web based solutions without additional installations enables the sharing and editing of around 100.000 forms within the network - with the samedi encryption technology to comply with medical confidentiality. Due to the simplified coordination of several ways of treatment (of approx. 60.000 patients) the amount of mistakes can be reduced and the transfer of information will be improved.

Lately kbo used MS-access for the administration of approx. 100.000 forms and 60.000 patient data. The coordination of the treatment processes between the involved institutions (Sozialpsychiatrische Dienste, Psychiatrische Institutsambulanzen, Arztpraxen und Heime) wasoften unclear and hence not only time-consuming but also very error-prone. To improve the intersectoral collaboration, it was searched for a web based solution, that would support the workflows and simultaneously guarantee secure information transfer.

The specific requirements of the crisis service demands a individually configurated IT-solution. The crisis service of the kbo possesses a telephone installation and the samedi® Comfort-Managed-Care software. When a patient phones in, the patient information will be shown in the patient-form-section (due to telephone number).

Description of the solution

1) crisis service

  • documents basic changes of master data (Stammblatt)
  • generates and edits forms
  • releases forms to care provider
  • documents brief phone calls in the telephone directory that is irrespective of patients
  • generates weekly activity abstract of all screening, input and development contacts
  • books patient appointments at SpDi with direct informationstransfer to the patients

2) the SPDi

  • get access to patient data
  • generate patientforms and release them to kbo coordination centre
  • offer online booking of appointments for crisis service

3) The PIA and other doctors and service providers:

  • get restricted read access to patient data and other forms

Congress

Care Terminology as the Prerequisite for Transfer Management

April 26, 2017
12:30 - 12:50 h

Congress Hall C

A seamless flow of information beyond sectoral boundaries and various professions in health care is necessary in order to ensure the continuity and thus the quality of patient care. However, media disruptions can arise even within the sectors as a result of a large amount of existing heterogeneous data (both structured and unstructured). Furthermore, in the health sector too the emergence of new therapeutic and diagnostic processes leads to an unanticipated rise in the volume of data requiring processing. As a consequence it becomes increasingly difficult to find information again, and to organise and manage it. In order to be able to apply this volume of data in a usable form it must be understandable and easy to manage, for example through the presentation of so-called valuable relevant data.


It is in the light of this situation that the question arises: how can IT systems support care providers when transferring to another sector? In addition to the aspect of functional interoperability, which will not be dealt with any further here, one significant aspect is that nursing and medical data, inasmuch as it is being documented by nursing staff, should be structured, free from defects, accountable and documentable. This is necessary in order to keep the amount of unstructured data to a minimum and to be able to filter relevant data.


If, using IT, cross-sectoral communication is to take place, and the necessary data and information about care and assistance for patients in all sectors is to be available, it is vital to effectively integrate (care) classification/terminology, i.e. technical language, in IT systems. With the increasing volume of data it is moreover not just a matter of providing this data in a structured form, but of also showing the filtered data, with reference to the facility providing the after care, to the patients, to special users etc. The prerequisite for this is the use of semantic technologies.


It is against this background that atacama Software GmbH began transferring the apenio care classification into a semantic structure some time ago. In this way various objectives were pursued which are, among other things, prerequisites for transfer management. The technical vocabulary, monitored and updated by care experts and linguists, is represented in the form of cohesive themes. By means of the semantic structure the important thematic areas of care are not scattered in various file structures but are accessible from various different contexts. In this way many different organisational dimensions can be combined with one another without being arranged redundantly. This means that the user is supplied with the relevant findings for that patient, that user, that after-care facility etc, on the basis of the semantic network. In addition the semantic search allows for the inclusion of synonyms and the application of available background knowledge. For example, with the search term ‘pulmonary disease’ not only the phenomena relevant to the care such as ‘breathing status’, ‘accumulation of secretions’, ‘breathing difficulty’ etc. can be shown but also, for example, impairments in the area of self-care, and much more besides.


Transfer management is not only concerned with transferring data from A to B, with providing the necessary interfaces and thus the functional interoperability, and with implementing the  e-Care report, but also with using an unambiguous, accountable and structured technical language which, in connection with a semantic network, offers substantially more advantages for users in all sectors.

Partner Event

Lunch & Talk “Components for Networked Care“

April 26, 2017
12:30 - 13:15 h

Pavilion Berlin/Brandenburg, Hall 3.2, Booth D-104

Host:

Berlin Partner for Business and Technology 

Congress

Keep it Simple – Company Management by means of Reduced Performance Indicators

April 26, 2017
12:40 - 13:00 h

Congress Hall A

Strategy “first” – a successful company needs a clear strategy and strictly defined objectives. Key performance indicators, accounting, controlling and liquidity ratios, as well as key process and personnel indicators all supply information that is important in managing the company, and thereby, in achieving economic objectives. For many years the Wertach clinics have been applying a clearly defined strategy, with a focus on a limited number of key performance indicators, as the basis for their success.

Congress

Panel Discussion with All Speakers

April 26, 2017
12:45 - 13:00 h

Congress Hall B

Congress

Panel Discussion with All Speakers

April 26, 2017
12:50 - 13:00 h

Congress Hall C

Congress

Panel Discussion with All Speakers

April 26, 2017
13:00 - 13:30 h

Congress Hall A

Panel Discussion/ Presentation

eHealth-Slam 2017

April 26, 2017
13:00 - 14:00 h

Networking Area, Hall 4.2

Host:

German Association of Health IT Vendors (bvitg) and German Association for Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology (GMDS)

Guided Tour

Interoperability - FHIR (HL7)

April 26, 2017
13:00 - 14:00 h

bvitg Booth C-117, Hall 4.2

Host:

German Association of Health IT Vendors (bvitg)

Panel Discussion/ Presentation

Medication Safety (AMTS) – Product Information 4.0

April 26, 2017
13:00 - 14:00 h

Networking Area, Hall 3.2

Host:

German Association of Health IT Vendors (bvitg) and German Association of Pharmacy-Software Vendors (ADAS)

Career

conhIT Newcomer Award

April 26, 2017
13:00 - 14:30 h

Career Area, Hall 2.2

Host:

conhIT - Connecting Healthcare IT

Excursion

MACSS (Medical Allround-Care Service Solutions) - Department of Nephrology

April 26, 2017
13:00 - 16:00 h

Charité - Campus Mitte Department of Nephrology

Host:

Berlin Partner for Business and Technology

Business Meeting

conhIT Business Meetings 2017

April 26, 2017
13:00 - 18:00 h

Business Meetings Area, Hall 4.2

Host:

Berlin Partner for Business and Technology and Enterprise Europe Network Berlin Brandenburg

Partner Event

IuiG-Initiative Council Meeting

April 26, 2017
13:30 - 15:00 h

Room Lindau 4, Meeting Bridge A, Hall 2.2

Host:

IuiG-Initiative Council

Partner Event

Praxisseminar AMTS: closed loop medication mit ID DIACOS® PHARMA/ID MEDICS®

April 26, 2017
13:30 - 15:30 h

Room Passau 2

Host:

ID Information und Dokumentation GmbH & Co. KGaA

Partner Event

Annual Meeting OR.NET e. V.

April 26, 2017
13:30 - 16:30 h

Congress Hall C

Host:

OR.NET e. V.

mobile health ZONE

AppCircus Competition: Award of the Best Health App

April 26, 2017
14:00 - 15:30 h

mobile health ZONE, Hall 2.2

Host:

AppCircus

Partner Event

Design Thinking: Searching for and Finding Innovations

April 26, 2017
14:00 - 17:00 h

Room Weimar 1, Meeting Bridge B, Hall 4.2

Host:

User Interface Design GmbH

Panel Discussion/ Presentation

focus “Is FHIR Burning in Germany too?”

April 26, 2017
14:15 - 15:15 h

Networking Area, Hall 4.2

Host:

Working Group on "Interoperability" of German Association of Health IT Vendors (bvitg)

Guided Tour

Patient Empowerment

April 26, 2017
14:15 - 15:15 h

bvitg Booth C-117, Hall 4.2

Host:

German Association of Health IT Vendors (bvitg)

Panel Discussion/ Presentation

Innovation Session 2017

April 26, 2017
14:15 - 15:30 h

Networking Area, Hall 3.2

Host:

German Association of Health IT Vendors (bvitg)

Workshop

The Electronic Patient Record Is Coming! Is the German Healthcare System Ready for It?

April 26, 2017
14:30 - 17:00 h

PR Room, Hall 1.2

Host:

German Association of Health IT Vendors and Dirk Heidenblut, MdB

Career

Career Workshop

April 26, 2017
14:45 - 15:45 h

Congress Hall B

Host:

conhIT - Connecting Healthcare IT

Guided Tour

Intelligent Assistance Systems & PHealth

April 26, 2017
15:30 - 16:30 h

bvitg Booth C-117, Hall 4.2

Host:

VDE – Association for Electrical, Electronic & Information Technologies

mobile health ZONE

Digital Health Startup Showcase

April 26, 2017
15:45 - 16:45 h

mobile health ZONE, Hall 2.2

Host:

Berlin Partner for Business and Technology and Health 2.0 Berlin

Panel Discussion/ Presentation

IT Security – Does It Come down to the Software?!

April 26, 2017
15:45 - 16:45 h

Networking Area, Hall 3.2

Host:

German Association of Health IT Vendors (bvitg)

Panel Discussion/ Presentation

Opportunity Costs of the Standstill: Benefits from eHealth

April 26, 2017
15:45 - 16:45 h

Networking Area, Hall 4.2

Host:

German Association of Health IT Vendors (bvitg)

Guided Tour

PEPA – Networked Health Care in the Patient’s Hands

April 26, 2017
15:45 - 16:45 h

bvitg Booth C-117, Hall 4.2

Host:

Heidelberg University Hospital

Career

Career-Speed Networking

April 26, 2017
16:00 - 17:30 h

Career Area, Hall 2.2

Host:

conhIT - Connecting Healthcare IT

Guided Tour

Apps & Wearables

April 26, 2017
16:45 - 17:45 h

bvitg Booth C-117, Hall 4.2

Host:

German Association of Health IT Vendors (bvitg)

Panel Discussion/ Presentation

Business Success Through the Best Possible Use of IT – Presenting the Five Key IT Topics of 2016

April 26, 2017
17:00 - 18:00 h

Networking Area, Hall 4.2

Host:

ENTSCHEIDERFABRIK

mobile health ZONE

Incubators and Accelerators as Part of the eHealth Eco-System

April 26, 2017
17:00 - 18:00 h

mobile health ZONE, Hall 2.2

Host:

German Association of Health IT Vendors (bvitg) and German Association for Internet Medicine (BIM)

Panel Discussion/ Presentation

Intelligent Assistance Systems and Personalised Health Technology: Promoting a Health-Oriented and Autonomous Lifestyle Through Digitisation

April 26, 2017
17:00 - 18:00 h

Networking Area, Hall 3.2

Host:

Association for Electrical, Electronic & Information Technologies (VDE)

Partner Event

Evening Reception@Berlin-Brandenburg Pavilion

April 26, 2017
17:45 - 19:45 h

Pavilion Berlin/Brandenburg, Hall 3.2, Booth D-104

Host:

Berlin Partner for Business and Technology

Evening Event

Gala of the German Association of Health IT Vendors (bvitg)

April 26, 2017
19:30 - 23:30 h

Bolle Festsäle

Host:

German Association of Health IT Vendors

Evening Event

conhIT Party 2017

April 26, 2017
- April 27, 2017 22:00 - 05:00 h

FELIX ClubRestaurant, Behrenstraße 72, 10117 Berlin

Host:

conhIT - Connecting Healthcare IT

April 27, 2017

Academy

Successful Implementation and Operation of PDMS for ICU and Anaesthesia

April 27, 2017
09:00 - 13:00 h

Academy Room, Hall 2.2

Congress

Analytical Forecasting for Minimising the MDK Checking Rate

April 27, 2017
09:30 - 09:50 h

Congress Hall B

Hospitals inevitably incur additional costs as a result of enquiries by the Health Insurers’ Medical Service (MDK), and a lot of time is also spent processing these enquiries. The higher the checking rate, the more likely this is to confront the hospital with an financial problem. It would be useful to have methods that help the hospital to predict the probability of an MDK examination in order to reduce the checking rate.
The method shown identifies so-called test samples and links them with the probability of an intervention by the health insurance scheme on the basis of historical accounting and processing information. The checking probability with reference to an actual case of treatment can, for example, be directly implemented in a coding solution and shown there.
This solution could then be seamlessly integrated in the documentation process, leading to a reduction in complexity, as well as intuitive and time-saving benefits.

Congress

Making your EHR Fit for Research - Requirements, Concepts, Examples

April 27, 2017
09:30 - 09:50 h

Congress Hall A

Modern hospitals of all types and sizes participate in medical research and re-introduce new scientific knowledge into practice, either to gain higher efficiency, quality or for economic reasons. EHRs and their vendors, usually focused on the duty of documentation, efficiency of routine processes and reimbursement, currently support tasks and needs of users from medical research only on a minimal level; a comprehensive solution would not only result in the implementation of research data and features within the EHR but in the integration of several research systems, with corresponding investment. Current research projects in the field of medical informatics emphasize in these very requirements, acts like the German „E-Health-Gesetz“ create new conditions that lead to an increasing rate of structured patient data and enhanced integration of and communication with medical systems. Within this context, implementing and integrating patient data, features and systems of medical research can be possible and should be done.


In this talk, typical requirements of users and systems from the field of medical research towards EHR systems will be shown. Concepts addressing these requirements will be explained. Based on examples from actual projects and products, you will see how you can implement these concepts into existing EHRs in such a way that both routine care and core processes can continue working free of interference.


The discussion and outlook will moot on potentials for new and enhanced standards to tackle the integration needs of clinical research for EHRs and on requirements that may be addressed to EHR vendors by researchers in the future.

Congress

The Digital Transformation in Healthcare is Already Happening – But at Home and not in the Institutions

April 27, 2017
09:30 - 09:50 h

Congress Hall C

The health care system is undergoing major changes at the present time. The catalysts for these changes can be basically divided into three dimensions:

A) End-users’ expectations

Who is not familiar with the words: ‘to risks or side effects ...’. But in reality a growing number of patients are consulting the internet, and the young generation (millennials) is prepared to exchange health-related, personal data in order to improve the success of therapy. Patients demand and expect that all those involved in health care should provide more and better services and information. This is accompanied by greater health awareness and a willingness to exert a positive influence on their therapy through changes in behaviour. It is for this reason that patients themselves are demanding more, better supported digital services and solutions.

B) Technological Innovation

Progress in information technology and in genetic engineering now provide an entirely new, individualised understanding of the interconnections between disease, behaviour, genetic disposition and possible therapies. One of the most prominent examples is personalised cancer immunotherapy (PCI). Expressed simply, in the treatment of cancer patients, T helper cells from the body’s own immune system are extracted, analysed, genetically modified, reproduced and administered to the patient as a therapeutic agent. In this way the manufacturers of pharmaceutical become direct providers of services to patients.

The equipment used in medical technology is more efficient, connected to the internet, smaller and more convenient, and opens up a new customer area, the patients themselves.  For example, patients suffering from COPD can now not only monitor their own blood oxygen levels but at the same time take mobile readings of their lung capacity using minute spirometers. Other completely new therapies will be available too on the basis of these innovations. In addition to pharmaceutical products and technical equipment this requires additional digital and mobile applications for the patient. As a result patients are able to directly experience their own personal health status and thereby exert a stronger influence on their individual behaviour.

C) Regulatory innovations

Around the world legislators face constantly rising health care costs. Preventive and performance-linked measures are increasingly required, both in the state sector and from private health insurance providers.

To an increasing extent in the approval process for new medicines, one of the factors to be considered is a reduction in costs as a result of a shift from in-patient to out-patient therapy, and even to therapy in the home. For example, currently an increasing number of cancer medications that are available on the market can be taken orally at home instead of intravenously in a hospital.

TO SUM UP – new digital services are coming and the process is being speeded up because of consumer IT. Patients want direct digital services and they want them quickly provided that they bring a direct added value. And they want these services to be simple – integrated in something that patients already know: the mobile phone, the internet and social networks.

The pharmaceutical and medical technology industries are developing personalised products and are searching for direct access to patients for them, especially through digital services on the basis of consumer IT. Regulators are intensifying the shift of therapy to the home.

The paper itself shows the digital transformation ‘at home’ throughout the three dimensions and presents examples of new digital services in conjunction with companies in the fields of pharmaceuticals and medical technology.

Congress

Session 13 | Innovative Healthcare IT

April 27, 2017
09:30 - 11:00 h

Congress Hall A

Congress

Session 14 | Securing Revenues through IT-based Management

April 27, 2017
09:30 - 11:00 h

Congress Hall B

Congress

Session 15 | Health IT vs. Consumer IT – Poles Apart or the Need to Act?

April 27, 2017
09:30 - 11:00 h

Congress Hall C

Congress

Automated Care Complex Measures Score: Calculation and Documentation by Means of Semantic Technologies

April 27, 2017
09:50 - 10:10 h

Congress Hall B

Since the introduction of the CCMS (Care Complex Measures Score) the parties involved have been under pressure to undertake valid and complete points acquisition. This rises as a result of greater complexity and an increasing importance for revenues. Software producers have to consider how the burden on these parties can be eased. The company atacama Software GmbH has examined possible technologies and has developed an autonomous calculation of the CCMS from apenio® patient documentation.

With the documentation of very costly care and making appropriate allowance for it in the DRG, efforts were also introduced to further improve CCMS. Increasing the proportion of care in the DRG and its extension to other areas helps to make care a more relevant revenue factor. CCMS as a parameter for determining the difficulty factors inherently increases its importance. Users are therefore under severe pressure to undertake points acquisition in the best possible way and above all clearly, and in this way to also achieve revenue following scrutiny by the health insurance inspector. With each expansion the documentation becomes more complex. The question arises as to the extent to which documentation systems can continue to be developed to prevent unnecessary duplication, and to enable calculations and reports to be automated.

If a classification is introduced for digital documentation there is a possibility that this can be logically linked with the CCMS. A semantic network which relates to apenio® classification concepts provides a suitable tool. The initial prerequisite is to ensure a higher granularity than that of the CCMS. Furthermore the underlying semantic network has been expanded to form a Petri net which, in addition to logical expressions, can also perform arithmetic which is necessary for the examination on CCMS.

This solution enables the calculation of the CCMS to be fully automated, provided that digital documentation is available in apenio®. By recording details of assessments and performance, wound documentation or scales, elements are generated that can be entered in the Petri net. This evaluates the current situation and automatically fills in a CCMS report. Separate documentation or examinations to establish the existence of a CCMS case are no longer necessary.

Because care is evaluated as a process, and each stage represents a verifiable interim finding, these can be logically comprehended by those responsible for care or controlling. No training or personnel costs are incurred because fewer parties are involved with CCMS. However, there are some pitfalls: Generous interpretations can sometimes lead to a large number of rejected cases and can increase mistrust when future checks are made. In the short term a stricter system results in fewer cases, but in the long term it leads to less problematic processes and higher revenues. The numbers increase in any case compared with manual documentation, because fewer cases remain undiscovered. The transparency and plausibility of the system are decisive. It has been possible to achieve greater acceptance of the system through visualisation of the solution process and a comprehensible presentation of the systematics. Up until now 90% of the hospitals in Germany that use apenio® for documentation purposes also employ automated CCMS.

Data which can be evaluated will continue to gain in importance for the care sector. If care becomes a more important factor in contributing to revenues then the increased complexity should not be allowed to lead reduced quality due to the weight of documentation. With smart systems it is possible to document what has actually occurred at a particular place. This approach may compensate for the increased complexity. Automated evaluation can focus the attention of care staff on the most important aspects and create space for them to concentrate once again on providing care.

Congress

Patients’ Smartphones in Clinic IT

April 27, 2017
09:50 - 10:10 h

Congress Hall C

Nowadays a well informed patient is regarded as a decisive success factor for effective, comprehensive treatment. For this reason it is important that patients bring the information that they have available when being admitted to a clinic, and can subsequently take reports and findings with them when they leave. The Patients’ Rights Law explicitly grants patients the right to receive copies of documents and, in the case of documents in connection with clarification of an issue, even free of charge. CD-Roms are frequently used for this purpose, but patients’ consumer PCs and laptops are to an increasing extent not fitted with drives. The only alternative is to use USB sticks, which are expensive to buy in large numbers, while patients insist that, in view of all the technical facilities in clinics, it must be possible to send information and documents to their smartphones.
What may sound easy to patients presents the IT departments in clinics with a whole range of challenges. The HIS network interfaces must also be accessible externally. Emails have to be securely encrypted, but on the other hand it must be possible for patients to de-encrypt them intuitively and without encountering technical obstacles. Whatsapp is no good, and although there may be a secure WhatsApp, it will certainly not be available to patients.
Using the example of patient clarification in combination with the patient app LifeTime, this paper show how patient anamnesis data and preliminary findings can be obtained for the first visit to the clinic and can subsequently be exchanged securely with the clinic, and used in the continuing internal clinical processes. The patient’s smartphone, running any operating system, is used for this purpose. Using the same technology it is also possible to send the signed explanatory notes electronically to patients as ‘their’ copy. In this way the patient retains an overview of his health and a complete medical history can be used cross-sectorally.
Using a journey by a patient in Hamburg as an example, we show the procedure and the challenges associated with the use of a patient’s smartphones for clinical IT.

Also present while the paper is being given will be the two creators of the LifeTime App, Dr. med. Johannes Jacubeit and Matthias Lau.

Congress

From Physician- to Patient-Moderated Electronic Health Records – PEHR in Practice at University Hospital Heidelberg

April 27, 2017
10:10 - 10:30 h

Congress Hall C

At Heidelberg University Hospital we pursue the realization of a personal, cross-enterprise health record (PEHR) with a gradual phasing-in. This contribution presents different stages of implementation that are in part used in routine and in part tested in research projects. First experiences show that major challenges come up – particularly for physicians and patients.

The Heidelberg University Hospital deals for more than 10 years with the question of how communication and the flow of information between physicians and towards patients can be supported using IT. With the PEHR approach a patient-moderated way is pursued. Due to the lack of available IT products supporting a PEHR, initially a physician-moderated electronic health record (EHR) was developed and rolled out. Within a research project, the implementation of a PEHR under control of patients was further developed in order to strengthen patients in carrying out their informational self-determination.

The PEHR architecture relies on the consistent use of standard-based solutions and the implementation of IHE profiles. Requirements analyses on the system were conducted with physicians and patients. Enhancements which were performed within the research project were tested and evaluated in feasibility studies with patients.

An EHR is in use for cross-enterprise data-exchange. Patients give their consent to participate in the EHR in the respective partner institution. The physicians of the participating institutions can send documents and image data to the EHR. Councils can be realized via the system, too. Physicians have the possibility to access the data of the EHR via a professional portal. Linking the professional portal from the clinical information system of the respective institution was implemented in a standard-based way.

Within the INFOPAT project (funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research) the EHR was extended to a patient-moderated PEHR. The patient is able to access his PEHR, to add documents and to centrally give permissions for a detailed access control to his/her PEHR. Additional applications such as a medication platform as well as a questionnaire module were integrated. In a further project a standardized interface was created for the connection of PEHR apps for mobile devices.

The technical feasibility could be demonstrated in the different PEHR stages, as the partners and the software vendors opened up to IHE and implemented the necessary IHE profiles. When migrating from EHR to PEHR and for a roll-out of the system, the central consent management as well as the connection of a provider directory are to be solved. Vendors of the primary systems have to implement IHE profiles more consequently.

Meeting the requirements of all stakeholders is a major challenge. To make the electronic health record interesting for physicians, medical documents and image data have to come in quickly and as automatized as possible. However, physicians have some concerns e.g. if patients can see medical findings before they can talk with the patient about the results. For patients, support structures for medical questions are needed in the future.

On our way to PEHR, we still have physician moderated health records in routine, which give access to physicians in hospitals and prospectively in private practices. The integration of the patient portal into routine is planned for one of the next stages, whereby necessary structures have to be established as well as legal and organizational questions have to be solved. The protection of the patient versus the right of the patient to demand information will be the topic of many upcoming discussions.

Congress

Patient Apps with no End in Sight: How Do Data Reach the Medical Office - And Why?

April 27, 2017
10:10 - 10:30 h

Congress Hall A

The lecture discusses a series of questions, such as:
Do practicing doctors have any desire at all to gain access to data from patients‘ smartphones?
If they do: Under which conditions are doctors interested in having these data? And what is of no interest to them? Which data are relevant, and how can they be processed and represented in medical office software? How can one go about the technical integration? A description of medatixx’s technical approach „medatixx-gate“ as well as a summary of the initial vision and first lessons learned in the course of the project conclude the lecture.

Congress

Transfer of Patient Documentation to Medical Experts of Health Insurance Companies by an eHealth-Solution

April 27, 2017
10:10 - 10:30 h

Congress Hall B

The new examination procedure agreement (PrüfvV) comes into force on 1 Jan. 2017, which requires not only a dialogue with the health insurance schemes but also the electronic transfer of documentation with the medical services of the health insurance schemes (MDK). The economic consequences of this process can be easily deduced against the background of the 12-15% of MDK examinations of all intensive care cases in German clinics. (1)

PrüfvV allows clinics a fixed period of 8 weeks to submit patient documents. The clinics are facing the challenge of putting together the relevant documents for the MDK examinations from a heterogeneous range of documents, with several IT systems and a continuing high volume of documentation on paper. On the other hand there is still no standardised specification for the transfer of documents in accordance with §11 Abs.  2 PrüfvV. Whereas one working party comprising several MDKs prefers a portal solution plus web service for uploading documents, other MDKs are aiming for a secure email transfer. Neither is there any agreement regarding the specifications for the data formats to be transferred. Some MDKs prefer individual (PDF) files for each document, while others favour more compact formats. Clinics therefore face the challenge of complying with all the different communication concepts from 1 Jan. 2017 in order to be able to make the required documents available to the MDK within the deadline. (2)

RZV GmbH, together with InterSystems and the Fraunhofer Institute for Software and Systems Technology, has developed an eHealth portal that allows clinics to allocate and transfer patients’ documents to the MDK. The underlying technology uses IHE profiles to connect to different primary systems and allows the automated extraction of documents from HIS, DMS and other internal IT systems in clinics. After defining the required document types such as medical certificate or care graph, this solution’s web portal permits a direct retrieval from connected primary systems and the subsequent import of selected documents to the eHealth platform. For paper documents there is the possibility of manual uploading from previously generated PDF files. Because not all the pages of a document may be needed for an MDK, PDF documents in the eHealth platform can be inspected using a viewer and divided into subsections.

Architecture in accordance with the Electronic Patient file (EFA), Specification 2.0, may be selected for external communication with the MDK. The implicit mechanisms for a temporary allocation of documents, a user administration conforming to data protection requirements, and continuous record-keeping of all measures comply with the MDK document management use case. Documents imported into the eHealth platform can be selectively marked for allocation, and a subsequent selection of the transfer automatically takes into account the communications specification from the relevant MDK. Information from the MDK such as reports about a successful transmission, or error messages, are imported into the eHealth portal and made available to clinic staff. Coloured traffic light-type markings provide clinic staff with early notification of the expiry of the transfer deadline. Lasting, safeguarded revenues through conformity with the deadlines as stated in PrüfvV can therefore be guaranteed.

An interface to the administrative MDK solutions allows the parameterised retrieval of the eHealth portal, thereby avoiding duplication of test cases. An evaluation dashboard provides clinical staff with transparency with regard to MDK management.

(1) See surveys at the start of the year by Medinfoweb (www.medinfoweb.de)
(2) The problems concerning the submission on time and proof of the documents submitted are categorised in various discussions on myDRG as relevant and presenting a risk to revenues (www.mydrg.de)

Congress

Analysis of Patient Empowerment Efforts over 30 Years

April 27, 2017
10:30 - 10:50 h

Congress Hall C

The 30-year history of patient empowerments encompasses the attempts to produce personal clinical records, experience of and with e-Patients, the internet as a second opinion, incentives from the health insurance schemes, and games that encourage a healthy lifestyle. What can we learn from all these trials, successes and reverses?

As CEO of the Medical Records Institute, C. Peter Waegemann has been addressing the question of patient empowerment for decades and offers an analysis.

Congress

Electronic Case Record as an Integral Part of Sustainable Cross-sectional Communication

April 27, 2017
10:30 - 10:50 h

Congress Hall A

With the introduction of the eHealth Law 2016 and the current framework agreement on discharge management in accordance with §39 SGB V, which comes into force on 1 July 2017, the focus turns to continuous treatment and support for patient across all sectors. Experience has been obtained from numerous national and international projects and models on how an intersectoral exchange of medical data can be implemented safely and in conformity with data protection requirements.

Two years agoRZV GmbH developed an eHealth platform by means of which international communication standards of different primary systems can be linked, enabling interaction with external partners. Due to its widespread acceptance by data protection specialists, the Electronic Patient file (EFA) in the specification 2.0 forms an integral component of the RZV eHealth platform. In particular they have given very positive assessments of the temporary retention and the specific purpose of the EFA. In order to link in primary systems the attempt is made to draw on these supported IHE profiles. As an alternative, ‘IHE-HL7-Wandler’ (converter) also offers routines that create an IHE conformity via HL7 interfaces.

The first product to be developed on this basis is an MDK document solution which allows clinics to extract documents from the primary system in accordance with an applicable test method agreement (PrüfvV) and to send them to the MDK requesting them. In this solution the challenge lies not only in the heterogeneity of the system landscapes in clinics (HIS, DMS, etc.), but also in the continuing absence of uniform guidelines for the transfer to the MDK. For example, some MDKs demand a categorisation of the documents to be transferred in accordance with a prescribed class register, while others accept the original designation of the documents, but do require a very differentiated structure for the (encrypted) emails. A cross-MDK solution must therefore take into account these overarching specifications and in this way take over the work of medical controlling, in each case manually configuring the adapted communication paths in response to specific requirements from the MDK.

Congress

Planning and Managing Services with Clinical Performance Groups Using a Maximum Care Provider as an Example

April 27, 2017
10:30 - 10:50 h

Congress Hall B

Changes to hospital financing as a result of the Hospital Structural Law, and continuing pressure of competition on the health market, make efficient and accountable planning and management of services essential. The basis is provided by consistent and easily understandable Clinical Service Groups (KLGs) in combination with tools for planning, analysis and control of the service activities. The paper presents the deployment of KLGs using a maximum care provider as an example.

 

The KLGs of the DRG Research Group Münster were developed parallel with the introduction of the G-DRG system in Germany, because G-DRGs are only of limited value for planning services and the management of clinics. G-DRGs combines patients with what are in some cases quite different medical services in a case group, provided that the treatment costs are basically comparable. It is often not possible to accurately deduce the actual services underlying the DRGs, which makes the communication with clinics about the data with regard to services and patients, processes and data validation much more difficult. In contrast a KLG case collective operates in accordance with primarily medical criteria, enabling the service activities to be presented in a transparent way. Clinicians can see the range of services of a department and the distinctions between the services, which are open to scrutiny, but they also have access to all the revenue-related information in the G-DRG-system.

 

The Business Intelligence solution HCe® (Health Care explorer) from the TIP GROUP® is the only software solution to fully integrate the KLGs in its data warehouse, thereby enabling case information to be displayed at any time in relation to the respective KLG and G-DRG. In addition to the extensive analytical possibilities for operative and strategic controlling, the solution also offers an application specifically designed for the planning process for the planning of services. This not only corresponds to the linguistic usage of the clinicians but also to their required planning granularity. It is only in this way that effective planning of services and management is possible.

 

The KLGs present the range of treatments and changes to services in a transparent and understandable way for the benefit of both the medical and the commercial management of a hospital. This boosts confidence in the data and leads to a greater mutual understanding of the relevance of management-related information. Users report that the introduction of KLGs has provided an instrument that enables medical and commercial staff to conduct discussions in the ‘same language’. In contrast to the G-DRG system, the fact that the KLGs are not subject to annual reconstruction is a beneficial feature and ensures that reporting retains its continuity.

 

New basic conditions for hospital financing resulting from the Hospital Structure Law and the ongoing problems surrounding the financing of investment costs will give added importance to portfolio management for hospitals in the coming years. Due to increasing competition greater efforts will be needed to force through process and cost optimisation measures. The quality of the services provided will become a much more important aspect as a result of the intention of legislators to introduce quality-based remuneration and hospital planning, accompanied by greater transparency with regard to quality. In response to the associated demands, service providers must present the performance indicators for changes in services and costs, processes and quality transparently and at the same time at a high aggregation level. Therefore, in future the field of application for KLGs could be extended to not only display services but could also be used to manage costs and for process and quality control purposes.

Congress

Panel Discussion with All Speakers

April 27, 2017
10:50 - 11:00 h

Congress Hall B

Congress

Panel Discussion with All Speakers

April 27, 2017
10:50 - 11:00 h

Congress Hall A

Congress

Panel Discussion with All Speakers

April 27, 2017
10:50 - 11:00 h

Congress Hall C

International Networking

How to Access the German Market: Best Practices in Digital Health

April 27, 2017
11:00 - 12:30 h

International Networking Lounge powered by GTAI, Booth B-111, Hall 4.2

Host:

Germany Trade & Invest

Partner Event

Focus on the User – User-Centric Processes to Develop Successful Digital Health Solutions

April 27, 2017
11:00 - 13:00 h

Room Lindau 4, Meeting Bridge A, Hall 2.2

Veranstalter:

Cluster IKT, Medien, Kreativwirtschaft und IDZ

Excursion

Fraunhofer FOKUS, Institute for Open Communication Systems

April 27, 2017
11:00 - 13:00 h

Fraunhofer FOKUS, Institute for Open Communication Systems

Host:

Berlin Partner for Business and Technology

Workshop

Start-up, and Then? Integrating Innovative Products in Healthcare!

April 27, 2017
11:00 - 13:00 h

PR Room, Hall 1.2

Host:

German Association for Internet Medicine (BIM)

Congress

The Uniform National Medication List (BMP) in Germany - Status and Prospects

April 27, 2017
11:30 - 11:45 h

Congress Hall A

The rollout of the uniform national medication list began in October 2016, as required by the E-Health Law. A great willingness to implement meant that even in the transition phase, users had the solutions at their disposal. The users identified with the project, with the result that now medication lists are increasingly being used and can even be updated electronically.

The E-Health Law, which came into force at the beginning of 2016, stipulated 1st October 2016 as the beginning of the rollout of the medication list (§ 31a of the SBG V). The specification which had been developed for a uniform national medication list (BMP), a part of the action plan to improve drug therapy safety (AMTS), was to be included. The concept provided for a simplified method of updating the paper list, based on an integrated 2D bar code, while simultaneously making the data contained in the list electronically available for further use. Which parts of the measures stipulated by the law were able to be implemented? Can the data be exchanged effectively? Are the first positive effects with regard to improving ATMS already apparent?

KBV, BÄK and DAV, together with industry, specified the requirements for implementation, which needed to be promptly realised. The existing specification was adapted and published.

Approx. 150 software solutions for medical practices (PVS), 40 for pharmacies (AVS) and 20 for hospitals (KIS with sub systems) were directly and indirectly called upon to implement the solution, which is to be mandatory for virtually all doctors and optional for pharmacists. Nearly one third of patients are affected; these have a right to a medication list according to § 31a, when taking more than 3 systemic drugs permanently.

Due to the extremely tight implementation schedule, on 1st October 2016 no comprehensive solution was in place, which was not a great problem, as a transition period of 2 quarters had been agreed. Shortly afterwards, a conformity assessment was conducted by the KBV and immediately afterwards a certification, which all PVS systems need to routinely undergo by law. By the end of the year, more than 90% of PVS systems had been implemented and the solutions for hospitals were also ready. Surprisingly, there were several manufacturers who simultaneously demonstrated apps for smartphones, which are suitable for both the professional community and patients. Initial tests showed that the installation is very simple and that medication lists can be scanned after just a few minutes. Users provided initial feedback, for example, that right after the date of implementation, more patient medication lists were presented in emergency rooms than before, although these lists did not yet meet the new standard.

Despite ample notice, it took more than a quarter of a year before the first solutions were running satisfactorily. Amazingly, despite initial reluctance, there was an onset of rapid and broad willingness to implement on the part of industry. The increase in medication lists is in itself a very good result, especially in view of the AMTS, which makes clear that the law has been adopted, and that a need has actually been satisfied by the law. Evaluation of individual improvements will surely follow and will find their way into new versions. The medication data now made widely available at a uniform level are also likely to form the basis for interoperability and other e-health implementations, e.g. in the next stage of the electronic medication list via eGK.

Congress

Information Security as Seen by the Investigators

April 27, 2017
11:30 - 11:50 h

Congress Hall B

The increasing complexity of activities in the cybercrime field, the associated potential damage, which may be severe  - depending on the degree of digitisation in the affected company -, and the resulting effects of this on society have led the federal state police departments and the Federal CID (Bundeskriminalamt – BKA) to establish a central consultancy office on cybercrime, called the Zentrale Ansprechstelle Cybercrime (ZAC).

The task of ZAC-Berlin is to advise and consult businesses in Berlin before they experience cybercrime damage and to coordinate police investigations if such damage does actually occur. In this work, it is important to take into account both prevention and law enforcement requirements.

In my contribution I would like to discuss the following points and share my experience as investigator in the cybercrime sector since 2007, in order to pass on some best practice advice.

  • Introduction to the ZAC
  • Current phenomena
  • Good preparation and planning as a guarantee for successful prevention – or at least reducing damage in most cases.

Congress

Session 16 | Implementing a Telematics Infrastructure and eHealth

April 27, 2017
11:30 - 13:00 h

Congress Hall A

Congress

UCARE Cards: Creating an Awareness of Usability for the Development of Technical Assistance Systems and Software

April 27, 2017
11:40 - 12:00 h

Congress Hall C

User-centred design and the involvement of the future user in the development processes are major factors in determining the success of modern technical innovation. However, they have also represented a serious deficiency in past research and development projects in the field of technical assistance systems and in software solutions in this sector [1]. After all, many small and medium-sized producers of software for the health and social management sector are not at all familiar with the term usability engineering, or simply do not have the budget to include usability [2].
UCARE cards are intended to support all those involved in the development process and to help them to obtain a better understanding of the context in which such systems are used.  

The producers of IT systems in the social economy are predominantly small and medium sized businesses with good specialist knowledge of the domains. A usability tool for heightening the awareness of usability is provided by the UCARE cards, which were developed and tested as part of the UCARE research project funded by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs. It is a simple usability tool that helps to conserve resources, and is used  in the form of workshops to discuss the context in which systems are used.

Three different types of cards can be derived from the context of use: actions, persons and environments. The UCARE cards are used in small groups and in different combinations. Participants discuss whether the software already in use meets certain framework conditions, and possibly whether new specifics about persons, actions or environments would lead to new system functionalities or what requirements a new, as yet undeveloped, technical system would have to fulfil. All the ideas are sketched out during the discussions.

Previous experience in the use of UCARE cards has shown that, with their assistance during the draft phase, new perspectives are opened up, thereby improving the usability of the system. UCARE cards also help in the work of drawing up functional and non-functional requirements. Furthermore, existing care software can be analysed , for example, in terms of non-supported functionalities, groups of persons, and environments, and a fresh impetus given for creativity and motivation in the development team. The development of systems is linked more closely than before to the user and with his requirements in certain situations, thereby leading to systems that are fit for purpose.

Until now UCARE cards have concentrated exclusively on in-patient care. The aim is to expand them to cover additional areas and fields of work such as the in-patient sector or performance accounting in order to increase the size of the target group employing this usability tool, and to achieve more space for generating ideas in other functionalities. The deployment of this working tool, designed specifically for this sector, is unique in the social economy, and the newly established association UCARE e.V. is hoping that there will be a greater awareness of usability, accompanied by a wider application of usability methods by both users and manufacturers in this field.

Sources:
[1] BMG study ‘lnformations- und Kommunikationstechnologie (lKT) in der Pflege’ –(Information and communication technology in Care) (eCare),
Working basis for the IV. Workshop ‘Handlungsempfehlungen für die Politik’ (Guidance for Politicians) on 13.9.2016 in Berlin (unpublished)
[2] Gräfe, B., Wolff, D., Timmermanns, S., Trappe. C., Rahner, S.: Potentiale von Usability in KMUs – Wohin geht der Trend der Hersteller von Dokumentationssystemen in der Sozialwirtschaft?, 2015  - (Usability potential in KMUs – What is the trend for manufacturers of documentation systems in the social economy) (unpublished)

Congress

Introduction of the Telematics Infrastructure – Demands on Manufacturers and Participants

April 27, 2017
11:45 - 12:00 h

Congress Hall A

The telematics infrastructure of the German health care system is currently being trialled. The eHealth Law, which was passed in 2015, defines not only legal time limits for the introduction of core data management of insured persons but also other applications which it is planned to implement in the next two years via the telematics infrastructure. These include in particular the management of emergency data management, the secure transfer of electronic medical reports, the electronic medication plan and, not least of all, the introduction of an electronic patient file.
The paper shows the technical requirements that must be met as a result by the manufacturers of hospital or medical information systems, and how these can be deployed on this market of the future. The current stage of development of the telematics infrastructure will be explained, and the prospects for the introduction of the aforementioned applications by the manufacturers of hospital information systems will be examined. The integration tasks that must be undertaken in a hospital in order to connect to the telematics infrastructure will also be shown. Here reference will be made to the experience of existing, successful integration as part of the preparations for trialling the telematics infrastructure. Insights into the required measures for communicating with users will also form part of this paper. The advantages of the impending introduction of additional medical applications will be shown, and some open questions addressed.

Congress

IT Security Risks in Hospitals – Identification and Prevention

April 27, 2017
11:50 - 12:10 h

Congress Hall B

Congress

Using the German Telematics Infrastructure - The Hospitals Perspective

April 27, 2017
12:00 - 12:15 h

Congress Hall B

The telematics infrastructure forms the basis for substantial areas of digitisation in the health care sector. On the basis of current specifications it will be explained what form the implementation of different applications in the telematics infrastructure will take. One main point is the gematik project ‘Migration of Health Data Services in the TI using the Electronic Patient file as an Example’, which answers the question of how existing health data services and networks can exploit the advantages of the telematics infrastructure.

There is a lot of talk about what can supposedly be done using TI. At the same time projects are being drawn up and solutions worked out which have been in preparation for a long time as TI applications. Stand-alone projects are created as a result of individual agreements which are then only available regionally or for specific groups of insured persons, or which prevent contact with other service providers as a result of technological links. The TI addresses many of the problems that arise in this way such as all-encompassing uniform safety mechanisms, electronic identities for all service providers, certificates for all organisations and for participating services. Parallel projects adversely affect the progress of the TI because they tie in important resources of the TI companies. An example of typical health applications is intended to show how these can be implemented with the aid of TI, and the benefits that this brings.

The basis for the paper is provided by the findings of the project ‘Migration of Health Data Services’ and the specifications provided for the online rollout of Stage 2. The relevant publications and the German government’s telemedicine portal were used in the selection of health applications, with those applications being selected whose benefits can be evaluated from a hospital’s point of view. Using example deployments  the possibilities of the telematics infrastructure are available in a practical sense, and work is then undertaken to establish what benefits arise compared with today’s customary stand-alone projects.

The intention is to enable the audience to assess the possibilities and potentials of the telematics infrastructure. Moreover it will be shown how a future services landscape could appear on the basis of uniform and comprehensively available telematics structures. To sum up, the benefits, in particular compared with stand-alone solutions, are concentrated on the essential features.

Taking a critical look at the availability over time of TI, manufacturers who are present will be encouraged to plan solutions that can be migrated into TI. Users should be called upon in the future to examine whether the applications being used reveal a possible way of migrating to TI. In closing, the outlook for further planning by gematik will be given.

Congress

Nursing and more - in Focus of Digitization

April 27, 2017
12:00 - 12:20 h

Congress Hall C

In the course of the demographic change towards a "society of a longer life" nursing becomes more and more important, particularly in the health place "at home". The accelerating digitization of all living areas does not exclude people with nursing needs, who are living alone in their own dwellings On the contrary, in this segment, significant prospects are seen in the medium term, to ensure the autonomy and quality of life of the patients and to master potential bottlenecks in the capacity of nursing professionals.

Nursing is traditionally very close to individual people. This enables a comprehensive holistic perception of the living conditions and needs of the patients and provides a high density of personal contacts and relationship. Against this backdrop, outpatient nursing care is particularly suited as a coordinating body and a switchboard for the co-operation of the various other actors, from the provider of household-related services, up to the family doctor, to the pharmacy and to the medical emergency service.

Digitization is increasingly allowing the use of technology for ongoing monitoring of the living environment and of the vital data of the patients. Applications from the field of "smart home" and for medicine care are converging. The potential of this technique cannot be overestimated, provided that it is accepted by all parties involved, and is wanted and can be used to the tangible benefits of the people being looked after. Already information about movement activities, sleep behavior, or the room climate, as recorded in smart home applications, provide important hints about the living conditions of immobile people, which - provided with nurturing support - are capable for independent living in their own home.

Congress

The Digital Integrated Health Network for Cross-sectoral Health Care – Patients in the Center of Digital Health Services

April 27, 2017
12:15 - 12:30 h

Congress Hall A

The intended comprehensive integrated digital data exchange between doctors, hospitals and pharmacies by the German government is still a long time coming. We intend to change that by collaboratly developing precise digital integrated solutions for the health care services in Berlin, Brandenburg and Mecklenburg-Vorpommern. Our purpose is to make data such as indications and laboratory results faster available and feasible within the meaning of the patients.

This is a main focus of our current digitalization efforts. Thus we are intensively working as a consortium on a cross-sectoral digital health platform. The corner stone for a secure but easy digitalized exchange between health professionals and patients is the IHE-Standard (Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise). IHE already constitutes the foundation for electronic health records in other countries such as Swiss, Austria or the USA.

The main objective is to digitalize and ensure an accurate exchange of data between all players involved in the health care provision (e.g. doctors, hospitals and health insurance) as well as to create a straightforward and user-friendly exchange of data between patients and the different health providers. By using modern technological-digital solutions is expected to increase the quality of health care services and put the patient back in the center.

Our goal is that all necessary medical data will be made available precisely where needed – whereby the patient keeps the decision-making authority at all times combined with the highest standards on data privacy and security requirements. A fundamental element of this overall solution is the digital patient record. By providing full transparency and encouragement of autonomy it allows the involved participants to take an active part on health supply and grants easy access to the acquired data.

When a patient agrees to sign in the integrated health network, the doctor saves the acquired medical results and health data in its medical software as before. At the same time the results are made available to access for other medical professionals. For example, if a patient subsequently needs treatment as an inpatient or receives therapeutic measures the medical specialists will be granted access to the medical data acquired by the treating physician after being verified. With this holistic solution it is possible to bypass paper-based prescription and reduce the administrative burden. Further, exchanging data will be much easier and faster which reduces waiting times for patients.

The focus at the moment is to collaboratly work on specific examples. Therefore, at first specific uses cases are identified following an indication approach as well as a regional approach.

Congress

More Efficient and Automated Diabetes Diaries with Smartwatches

April 27, 2017
12:20 - 12:40 h

Congress Hall C

Diabetes Diaries (DD), which should be kept be the diabetes mellitus patient on a daily and steady basis, will help the expert on diabetes to verify and optimize the individual therapy. Induced behavioral factors on the therapy, e.g. physical activity patterns, especial stress situations, the amount of sleep and extraordinary meals will find their way into the diary, if at all, only from the biased subjective point of view of the recording person. This has changed very little by the progressing digitalization of DD from paper to PCs and smartphone apps. Especially for elderly patients, such a digital infrastructure and utilization competence can only rarely be presupposed.

First, the automatic production of DD by smartwatches has the advantage that induced behavioral influence factors on the diabetes mellitus: physical activity and sleep patterns, heart rate will be recorded over the whole course of the day in an objective manner. By using a smartwatch with an integrated cellular phone (e.g. Samsung Gear™, LG Urbane™) it is guaranteed that the DD will be transferred to the physician’s office in any way. No additional IT infrastructure (e.g. smartphone, internet access via Wifi) has to be presupposed for the patient. The autonomous communication ability of the smartwatch also allows for telemedical consultations with the attending expert on diabetes, especially for identifying causes of hypoglycemia in short-term, without the necessity for the patient to present himself in the physician’s office with his smartwatch personally. In addition to the fully automatic logging of the patient’s moving behavior, sleep patterns and heart rate, the patient can add to the smartwatch app data records about special induced behavioral factors, e.g. high-carbohydrate diets or alcohol consumption, manually and in an unobtrusive way. In this case, however, the same reservations are valid as for the traditional manual DD production.     

The smartwatch app technology for automatic DD production stems on the detection of activities and events of daily living (ADLs, EDLs).  This detection process is the basis of the assistance technology for elderly people developed by us, in order to assure a self-determined and safe life in the familiar home until the very-high age. Also for this user group, a technology had to be developed, which required preferably no installation work and did not presuppose any available additional IT infrastructure.
 
With the smartwatch produced DD, even with no blood rsp. tissue liquid glucose measurements at all or in case of only non-regular measurements, as it is the case for many diabetes mellitus type 2 patients, the induced behavioral portion of the long-term HbA1c glycohemoglobin values can be correlated more objective than before. 

Congress

IT Security from the Manufacturers' Perspective

April 27, 2017
12:30 - 12:50 h

Congress Hall B

Congress

It’s Getting Serious – the Current Statutory Instrument

April 27, 2017
12:30 - 12:50 h

Congress Hall B

Congress

Panel Discussion with All Speakers

April 27, 2017
12:30 - 13:00 h

Congress Hall A

Partner Event

Award ceremony „getIT Health Tourism“

April 27, 2017
12:30 - 13:30 h

International Networking Lounge powered by GTAI, Booth B-111, Hall 4.2

Host:

Berlin Partner for Business and Technology

Congress

NAMES – Emergency and Assistance Systems for Retaining Mobility and Increasing Autonomy in and Around the Home

April 27, 2017
12:40 - 13:00 h

Congress Hall C

Demographic change will have a lasting impact on our society. Many senior citizens, the care-dependant, the disabled and dementia sufferers require attention in retirement homes, sheltered housing or care homes. In the future barrier-free accommodation designed for the elderly will enable people to remain longer in familiar surroundings. This also underlines the importance of ensuring security in and outside the accommodation, by means of affordable additional equipment which, with an increasing need for assistance, must also be designed to be retrofitted. It is also vital that assistance is within easy reach.

The main task for the relevant facilities is to make everyday life worthwhile for those who are dependent on such care and assistance, as well as maintaining and encouraging their independence. The main factors in achieving this are to determine and monitor the whereabouts of persons, to provide both a manual and an automated emergency call function, and to ensure the best possible support when needed.

NAMES is a robust and fault-tolerant location system for use in residential areas, and one that enables mobility- and security-conscious residents to live independently and autonomously in their homes, in sheltered housing or in retirement homes. The communication capabilities offered by this solution provide for emergency call functions to be activated either manually (by the user) or automatically (in response to a particular event or chain of events).

The NAMES project faced the technical challenge of being able to reliably identify a location in buildings, as well as allowing for a secure transition to GPS location-finding outdoors. Indoor location-finding is a new development that uses two independent technologies as a secure method of avoiding false alarms: e-home ceiling sensors and iBeacons. Developed by Fraunhofer IIS, this localisation system uses the signals from these beacons for position fixing based on a fingerprinting process. Localisation is an innovative solution using coordinate-free position fixing which can deduce spaces directly from signals. No map is needed. Localisation generates semantic designations that can be understood by everyone (e.g. the names of rooms, such as kitchen, dining room). As a result the system can be put into operation rapidly and easily. TeleOrbit GmbH combines this technology with existing position-fixing systems. The emergency call and alarm app has been further developed for use in smartphone watches and has been enhanced for indoor position-fixing.

Congress

In-depth Closing Discussion with all the Speakers

April 27, 2017
12:50 - 13:30 h

Congress Hall B

Guided Tour

Electronic Patient Records

April 27, 2017
13:00 - 14:00 h

bvitg Booth C-117, Hall 4.2

Host:

German Association of Health IT Vendors (bvitg)

Panel Discussion/ Presentation

focus “The German National Medication Plan for Patients?!“

April 27, 2017
13:00 - 14:00 h

Networking Area, Hall 3.2

Host:

Working Group on "Medication Safety" of German Association of Health IT Vendors (bvitg) in Cooperation with E-HEALTH-COM

Panel Discussion/ Presentation

Terminological Systems in Germany: Status Quo and Perspectives

April 27, 2017
13:00 - 14:00 h

Networking Area, Hall 4.2

Host:

Bundesverband Gesundheits-IT – bvitg e. V.

Guided Tour

Medical Inspection Tools

April 27, 2017
13:30 - 14:30 h

bvitg Booth C-117, Hall 4.2

Host:

German Association of Medical Controlling

mobile health ZONE

From Germany to the USA – Start-ups Report on Their Experiences in the American Healthcare System

April 27, 2017
14:00 - 15:00 h

mobile health ZONE, Hall 2.2

Host:

German Association of Health IT Vendors (bvitg) and German Association for Internet Medicine (BIM)

Panel Discussion/ Presentation

Big Data: In Search of the Use Case

April 27, 2017
14:15 - 15:15 h

Networking Area, Hall 4.2

Host:

German Association of Health IT Vendors (bvitg)

Panel Discussion/ Presentation

Failure in the System: Politics Fails at Sector Boundaries

April 27, 2017
14:15 - 15:15 h

Networking Area, Hall 3.2

Host:

German Association of Health IT Vendors (bvitg) and GVG

Guided Tour

Mediaction Safety

April 27, 2017
14:15 - 15:15 h

bvitg Booth C-117, Hall 4.2

Host:

German Association of Health IT Vendors (bvitg)

Workshop

Interoperability for Clinical Registers

April 27, 2017
14:15 - 15:45 h

PR Room, Hall 1.2

Host:

German Association of Health IT Vendors (bvitg)

Panel Discussion/ Presentation

Mobile Health – Uncovering Treasures, Knowing the Risks

April 27, 2017
15:30 - 16:30 h

Networking Area, Hall 3.2

Host:

German Society for Telemedicine

Panel Discussion/ Presentation

The Quality of Apps in Medical Care

April 27, 2017
15:30 - 16:30 h

Networking Area, Hall 4.2

Host:

German Association of Health IT Vendors (bvitg) and Bitkom

Evening Event

conhIT-Closing Party 2017

April 27, 2017
16:30 - 18:00 h

bvitg Booth C-117, Hall 4.2

Host:

German Association of Health IT Vendors (bvitg)

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